Wacom eStore - official Onlinestore Wacom InfoChannel http://eu.shop.wacom.eu/wacom-infochannel?p=6 2017-09-22T04:49:46Z Tips & Tricks | Photoshop Compositing Made Simple: the L.E.N.S System http://eu.shop.wacom.eu/wacom-infochannel/tips-und-tricks-photoshop-compositing-made-simple/1046?c=2213303 Ever wonder how to merge and collage images in Photoshop — so seamlessly that the final photo looks real?

Photoshop Compositing Made Simple: the L.E.N.S System

Ever wonder how to merge and collage images in Photoshop — so seamlessly that the final photo looks real?

In this free class from Skillshare, Photoshop guru Pete Collins uses his Wacom Cintiq 27QHD to show us part of his signature L.E.N.S. system for compositing images in a realistic way – how to tweak the lighting, elevation, noise, and sharpness to perfection and make your images jump off the page. Whether you're a beginner or Photoshop pro, this class will inspire you to look at images differently, make your own, and have a lot of fun in the process. 

This one-hour walk-through is loaded with tips, tricks and keyboard shortcuts as Pete shares the L.E.N.S. system for compositing and how to fine-tune the four key components of a successful composite:

- Lighting
- Elevation
- Noise
- Saturation

Be forewarned – you may get addicted to Pete’s class assignment, embellishing your loved one’s likeness into a fantastical figure.

See a short preview here of the class here:

Looks interesting?
You can enroll in Pete's full Skillshare class for free by clicking here.

Special bonus:

We’ve also partnered with Skillshare to offer the Wacom community a FREE 3-Month Skillshare Premium Membership. You can check out thousands of other online classes on topics like design, illustration, animation or photography and help build your skills today

]]>
Wed, 01 Jun 2016 11:22:32 +100
Tips & Tricks | Four Tips for Artists Who Want to Succeed http://eu.shop.wacom.eu/wacom-infochannel/tips-und-tricks-four-tips-for-artists-who-want-to-succeed/1045?c=2213303 We all want to be succesful artists, in some way or another. And with so much competition, it can be difficult to break through. We, at Wacom, want to help you succeed as an artist. And we know that in order to do so, the experience from professionals is essential.

Four Tips for Artists Who Want to Succeed

We all want to be successful artists, in some way or another. And with so much competition, it can be difficult to break through. We, at Wacom, want to help you succeed as an artist. And we know that in order to do so, the experience from professionals is essential.

In the 20 years Aaron Blaise was a Disney animator, he worked on an incredible range of films, including Brother Bear, Beauty and the Beast, The Lion King, Mulan, Pocahontas, and more.  Now his website, The Art of Aaron Blaise, and his YouTube channel, Aaron’s Art Tips, help him teach animation and fine art to thousands of followers from all over the world.  He has useful advice on how to succeed as an artist.

Be Persistent

Blaise said, “I feel like we have come to a time now — I’m calling it the American Idol generation—where everybody wants instant success, and if they don’t get it, they give up. I think we have to get past that.” Rather than waiting for your single star moment, Blaise suggests the more old-fashioned value of persistence.

“Pick your path and go down it. A lot of people think they know where they’re going to end up,” he explained, “but I guarantee you won’t end up in the place you think. As long as you have this passion and love for art and this drive, it’s going to take you to places you don’t expect.”

Be Collaborative

Blaise pointed out that being an animator is by nature a collaborative job. “If you want to be an animator and work at a studio, you have to work with a hundred other people. So don’t be a jerk!” he laughed. Being open to new ideas helps smooth every work process.

Be Consistent

“Draw every day. Paint every day,” Blaise said. “I draw because I love drawing. Do it because you love it.” He keeps multiple workspaces for home and office so he can work no matter where he is. And he still has the original desk where he drew Disney animation for many years.

Be Realistic

When asked what advice he’d offer artists just starting out, Blaise joked, “Don’t do it for the money, that’s the thing I tell them.  The money will come. But if you’re going into this thinking you’re going to make tons of money, then figure something else out.” Measured expectations are more realistic than overnight stardom.

Mentored by legendary Disney animator Glen Keane, Blaise is grateful to be able to pay Keane’s advice and friendship forward.  The most important advice he would offer young artists?  “If you’re not passionate about it, especially in this industry, then don’t do it, because it will destroy you.  But if you really have a love for it, it will be the most fulfilling, incredible career you could ever imagine.”

]]>
Tue, 31 May 2016 17:07:15 +100
Tips & Tricks | Preparing for Your Animated Movie Pitch http://eu.shop.wacom.eu/detail/index/sArticle/1044/sCategory/2213303 Need help with creating a movie pitch? Wacom and Disney Animator Aaron Blaise have got you covered!

Tips for Preparing for Your Animated Movie Pitch

Need help with creating a movie pitch? Wacom and Disney Animator Aaron Blaise have got you covered!

Aaron Blaise spent more than 20 years as a Disney animator and director. He’s now creating his own films. With all of this experience, he’s become very familiar with the art of the movie pitch. He has a great story about an epic pitch meeting, how he won that pitch, and how his tip also helped his workflow.

Create Finished, Polished Images

“I learned early that the closer you can get an image to look like the finished frame of film that you envisioned for the movie, the quicker it’s going to get approved by executives,” he explained.  Blaise found that executives did not fully understand his vision if he showed them line drawings of the character; they didn’t share his artistic vision.  “I started training myself when I created a character in Photoshop to paint them and light them correctly, but also to bring in photographic textures and blend it all together.  Basically I use anything I can digitally to create an image that looks like what I think the movie should look like.”

Epic Pitch Meeting

“One of the biggest meetings I ever had,” he said, “I was at Pixar pitching to Steve Jobs, John Lasseter, Ed Catmull, who is John Lasseter’s partner, and Bob Iger, who is the head of Walt Disney Pictures.  It was just all these big titans.  And I had been spending about a year or so creating imagery for how I thought this movie should look.  We pitched the movie, and I also explained the imagery.  At the end of the meeting, it was Steve Jobs who sat up and pointed at the main image I created for the whole presentation and said, ‘That’s the movie I want to see.’”  Blaise laughed.  “There you go!  One image.”

Workflow Benefits

Blaise explained that this also helped with workflow.  “If I give somebody a rough sketch, they’re going to go away and say, ‘I think I understand,’ and they’ll do something and bring it back, and then I go, ‘No, no, no.  Do it more like this.’  But if I can really sit down and create what I think I want it to look like, then we might only go back and forth once or twice.  Compound that over the course of an entire film with 200 different people, you’re saving millions and millions of dollars in the budget.  Over three or four years and that many people, those man hours really add up.  That’s the practical side of it.” 

Art Story

Blaise’s method of creating finished, polished images has also served him well on Kickstarter, where he found more than 1700 backers to fund his latest movie, Art Story.
Art Story is about a boy and his grandfather who get stuck in a world of master paintings.  Explaining the premise to people who are only engaged in animation as consumers might seem like a daunting battle, but Blaise’s pictures told the story for him.  It received full funding and is on the path to being made.  Sometimes a picture really is worth a thousand words.

]]>
Tue, 31 May 2016 12:04:40 +100
Tips & Tricks | Creating an Awesome Print Portfolio http://eu.shop.wacom.eu/wacom-infochannel/tips-und-tricks-creating-an-awesome-print-portfolio/1043?c=2213303 We want to help you build a portfolio that leaves a great impression! So we asked the pros for tips. Not just any pros, two people who graduated from Ringling College of Art and Design and are now considered some of the most influential people in their fields.

Tips for Creating an Awesome Print Portfolio

You know the old saying: you never get a second chance to make a first impression. For art students, and pros, a portfolio is that crucial first impression. It can make or break entry into art school, or an interview for that dream company.

We want to help you build a portfolio that makes a great first, second and third impression so we asked the pros for their tips. Not just any pros, two people who graduated from Ringling College of Art and Design and are now considered some of the most influential people in their fields: Aaron Blaise and Nick Burch.

After graduation, Blaise went on to work for that dream company: Disney. He animated movie such as, The Rescuers Down Under, Beauty and the Beast, Aladdin, The Lion King, Pocahontas, and Mulan to name a few.
Nick Burch is a computer animator who founded Digital Three and counts the U.S. Navy, Verizon, the University of Florida, Ringling College of Art and 10Vox Entertainment among his clients.

Tips on creating a print portfolio from Aaron Blaise and Nick Burch:

1. Treat your portfolio  as a project or work of art itself
Consider looking at professional art books. How is work presented? Pay attention to page layout, fonts, margins, etc.

2. Include your résumé, contact info and label your work
Often individual images will become separated from the main portfolio. Make sure if an art director or potential employer pins your image to the wall that it includes your pertinent info.

3. Keep it clean
Simple layouts are good.

4. Limit your portfolio to 10 - 15 pieces
Keep it focused. - Know the purpose of each project in your portfolio and be able to defend them.

5. Be ready to talk about it

6. Show only your best work
Be able to self-edit.

7. Get feedback

8. Create multiple customized portfolios
Know your audience.

9. Invest in a format that you’re passionate about.
But make sure you can afford to reproduce if needed.

10. Create an order that works for you
However, don't make the viewer “drive" the portfolio. This means don’t make them flip back and forth between horizontal and vertical page layouts. If you divide your work this way, try to only do it once.

11. Do not send originals

12. Include as much professional work as soon as possible
If you don’t have any that’s ok but consider taking on projects outside of your class work. Your art and your portfolio will benefit from this.

13. It is never really finihed
Accept that your portfolio is never really finished. It is a living document.

*Bonus Tip - Rule of Thumb:

Try to show nothing older than 3 years unless it’s a major professional accomplishment.

Pitfalls to avoid:

1. Don’t try to please everybody.

2. Don’t hold on to work for sentimental reasons

]]>
Mon, 30 May 2016 13:22:29 +100
Tips & Tricks | Creating an Awesome Digital Portfolio http://eu.shop.wacom.eu/detail/index/sArticle/1042/sCategory/2213303 We want to help you build a portfolio that makes a great first, second and third impression. So we asked the pros for their tips. Not just any pros, two people who graduated from Ringling College of Art and Design and are now considered some of the most influential people in t...

Tips for Creating an Awesome Digital Portfolio

The first impression you make, counts. And for art students, and pros, a portfolio is a crucial first impression. It can make or break entry into art school, or an interview for that dream company.

We want to help you build a portfolio that makes a great first, second and third impression. So we asked the pros for their tips. Not just any pros, two people who graduated from Ringling College of Art and Design and are now considered some of the most influential people in their fields: Aaron Blaise and Nick Burch.

Nick Burch and Aaron Blaise, both graduates of Ringling College of Art and Design, know a thing or two about portfolios. Blaise leveraged his into a position at Disney. Burch used his to kick start a career with clients including the U.S. Navy, Verizon, the University of Florida, Ringling College of Art and 10Vox Entertainment.

Last time we asked these two for tips on creating a print portfolio. The tips were so clear and concise we knew we needed to get tips on creating a digital portfolio. Lucky for us, these two were up for more.

Tips on digital portfolios from Aaron Blaise and Nick Burch:

1. Include a logo
(or "brand" image) and tag line.

2. List your services
What skills are you great at?

3. Clearly and prominently display you contact info
Don’t make a potential employer/ client have to hunt to reach you. 

4. Have a call to action
What do you want them to do when they land on your site. Is it clear?

5. Put the emphasis on your work
Bio and personal details are less important. Your design should reflect this.

6. Make it easy to read and to navigate
Get feedback. If you have to explain it then it’s not working.

7. Let it express some of your personality
(but not too much) - Websites are a great place to communicate your personal style but try to keep it in check. (See #5)

8. Always consider your audience
Make potential clients/employers comfortable.

9. Make sure it is an easy-to-update format
If you cannot keep it up-to-date then leave dates off of it all together.

10. Only include your BEST content
A portfolio site is only as good as the worst image on it.

11. Include only professional testimonials and references

12. Include social networking links
But only if you behave professionally there (See #8).

13. Include a downloadable résumé

14. Categorize and tag your work.
This helps the user and the search engines.

Pitfalls to avoid:

1. Avoid Flash. - Unless you are an expert or it is absolutely necessary.

2. Don’t include many external links. - To other artists, etc… Would a business link to their competition?

]]>
Mon, 30 May 2016 12:51:15 +100
Sew Your Own ‘Adorkable’ Cintiq 13HD Tablet Sleeve - A DIY Tutorial http://eu.shop.wacom.eu/wacom-infochannel/sew-your-own-adorkable-cintiq-13hd-tablet-sleeve-a-diy-tutorial/1041?c=2213303 Samarra Khaja, illustrator, graphic and textile designer, and author, makes happy, beautiful things. Recently, she’s taken on the challenge of creating a cuddly, whimsical case that’s perfect for her hard-working Cintiq 13HD.  

Sew Your Own ‘Adorkable’ Cintiq 13HD Tablet Sleeve - A DIY Tutorial

Samarra Khaja, illustrator, graphic and textile designer, and author, makes happy, beautiful things. Recently, she’s taken on the challenge of creating a cuddly, whimsical case that’s perfect for her hard-working Cintiq 13HD.
Inspired to create something suitably techie, Samarra recreated a retro test pattern from late-night TV surfing of yesteryear into a cohesive graphic mash-up of old and new. The test pattern, more formally known as the Society of Motion Picture and Television Engineer’s Guideline EG1-1990, represents the three primary colors used in broadcasting (red, green and blue), the three secondary colors (yellow, cyan and magenta) and standardized levels of white, black, color saturation and color phase. The bars are used by video engineers to establish unity gain in a transmission chain from point of origin to point of final transmission.

“I wanted to make sure that the project was suitable for all skill levels, didn’t take very long to make and was functional,” says Samarra. ”The fabric types and colors are easily customizable: simply swap the cotton fleece lining out for a good 1970’s corduroy vibe or even a sharp velvet if you’re feeling extra fancy. Color-wise, a true test pattern contains magenta, but I opted for a burst of neon pink for added pop. It was also a great time to introduce everyone to Yeti, who tells mehe’d also use a Cintiq if he could only hold a stylus properly. At least he has mad sewing skillz."

Get Crafty and Learn How to Sew Your Own Cintiq 13HD Case

 

Wacky, wonderful and whimsical art and illustration

Inspired by her love of travel, local markets, food and culture, nostalgia, and her young kids, Samarra revels in experimentation, turning the seemingly usual on its head and presenting concepts in a new unexpected light. Her textiles remix traditional fabrics with contemporary design with a cheerful irreverence. They’re bright, bold and, best of all, playful.

Samarra uses her Cintiq 13 to create illustrations for client work as well as her own craft products and fabric designs. All the illustrations in her sewing book (Sew Adorkable: 15 DIY Projects to Keep You Out of Trouble –Quilts, Clothes and Gear for the Chic Geek) and many of the drawings from her coloring book (Off the Bookshelf: 45+ Weirdly Wonderful Designs to Color for Fun and Relaxation ) were created on the tablet. “Before using a Cintiq, I would literally spend hours converting my pen & ink drawing into editable, print-ready vector files. With the Cintiq, I get that time back.”

Adding to that, she says, “I think another wonderful component is how the Cintiq has not eliminated my pen & ink drawing but rather, enhanced it. I can now start an idea on paper, scan it in and finish the idea on my Cintiq without losing the pen & ink feel in the process.”

Samarra’s clients include The New York Times, the Guggenheim, Bliss, Time Magazine, Victoria’s Secret and Cirque du Soleil. She’s exhibited worldwide and won several awards, but gets the biggest kick from seeing her prize-winning 24’ x 120‘ mural, “Heartbeat Brooklyn” featuring a smiling clawfoot bathtub, bagels on a roller coaster, and hot-dogs on a ferris wheel, all frolicking and untouched by graffiti on the side of Lowe’s Brooklyn store.

Learn More about Samarra:

Website

Tumblr

Timeless Treasures

Spoonflower

Facebook

Twitter

Instagram

]]>
Thu, 19 May 2016 15:47:30 +100
Wacom opent tweede Experience Center in Nederland http://eu.shop.wacom.eu/wacom-infochannel/wacom-opent-tweede-experience-center-in-nederland/1039?c=2213303 Vanaf donderdag 19 mei 2016 hebben fotografen, fotobewerkers, illustratoren en digitale kunstenaars de kans om in het nieuwe Wacom Experience Center bij CameraNU.nl op Urk de producten van Wacom te ontdekken en zelf uit te proberen.

Wacom opent tweede Experience Center in Nederland

Vanaf donderdag 19 mei 2016 hebben fotografen, fotobewerkers, illustratoren en digitale kunstenaars de kans om in het nieuwe Wacom  Experience Center bij CameraNU.nl op Urk de producten van Wacom  te ontdekken en zelf uit te proberen.

Van het Cintiq 27QHD pen display tot aan het Wacom Intuos Art Pen & Touch tekentablet staat hier de volledige productlijn van Wacom opgesteld. Geïnteresseerden kunnen hier uitgebreid aan de slag om te ontdekken welk van de brede  range pen tablets, creatieve pen displays en  professionele  mobiele  oplossingen  het  best  bij  hun  past. Medewerkers van CameraNU.nl  staan  klaar  voor  uitleg.  Het is dan  ook de  perfecte plek voor elke fotograaf, grafischnontwerper, kunstenaar en iedereen die zijn creativiteit tot uiting wil brengen!

Tijdens de opening zijn Wacom  product  experts Stefan Vermulst en Olger van Cootwijk aanwezig voor vragen. Ook op zaterdag 21 mei zal Stefan Vermulst productdemonstraties geven. 

Met de opening van het nieuwe Wacom Experience Center bij CameraNU.nl biedt Wacom de professionele eindgebruiker en enthousiaste amateur een tweede locatie in Nederland aan om het gehele Wacom assortiment te bekijken en uit te proberen. Het eerste Wacom Experience Center van Nederland werd geopend  in  september 2015 en is gevestigd bij Informatique Computers en Componenten in Berkel en Rodenrijs in de omgeving van Rotterdam.

CameraNU.nl is één van de grootste fotowinkels in Nederland. Op een oppervlakte van 800m2 krijgen hier professionals vakkundig advies op maat. De winkel op Urk is centraal gelegen en makkelijk te bereiken.

Opening Wacom Experience Center

Datum 19 mei 2016 14.00 uur 
Adres CameraNU.nl, Het Spijk 8, 8321 WT, Urk 
Link http://www.cameranu.nl/nl/wac 

]]>
Tue, 17 May 2016 10:27:18 +100
Launching at London Fashion Week with Bamboo Spark: We are KIN http://eu.shop.wacom.eu/wacom-infochannel/launching-at-london-fashion-week-with-bamboo-spark-we-are-kin/1038?c=2213303 Ngoni Rutendo Chikwenengere – or simply NRC as she refers to herself – is a lifestyle blogger and fashion designer. She just debuted at London Fashion Week with her label ‘We are KIN’. For a girl growing up watching Fashion TV on repeat this is a dream come true.

Launching at London Fashion Week with Bamboo Spark: We are KIN

Ngoni Rutendo Chikwenengere – or simply NRC as she refers to herself – is a lifestyle blogger and fashion designer. She just debuted at London Fashion Week with her label ‘We are KIN’. For a girl growing up watching Fashion TV on repeat this is a dream come true.

“Presenting a collection at London Fashion Week meant getting organised” remembers Ngoni. “I was constantly circling ideas and to dos with the team.”
Check out the video below for the behind-the-scenes view of the exciting moments just before the show, see where she gets her inspiration from and watch how she keeps track of everything by using the Bamboo Spark.

 

What’s in a Name?

The name ‘We Are KIN’ comes from ideas of kindred spirits. It is a very inclusive brand and collaboration is at the heart of it. Not surprisingly, her work philosophy and advice for other aspiring talents is as clear and straight forward as her design: “Work hard and be nice – you never know who is watching!”

Ngoni finds her inspiration from anything anywhere. She loves travelling, cooking, baking, working out and of course fashion. Her blog IamNRC is a visual diary of all this and keeping up with the constant flow of ideas is so much easier now. “In an ideal world I would be able to sketch my ideas on paper and have them digital. With the Bamboo Spark this is totally possible.”

To purchase or learn about Bamboo Spark, click here.

]]>
Mon, 09 May 2016 11:55:35 +100
Born to be a Wildfang: Bamboo Spark and Relentless Hustle http://eu.shop.wacom.eu/wacom-infochannel/born-to-be-a-wildfang-bamboo-spark-and-relentless-hustle/1037?c=2213303 What makes someone a Wildfang? A touch of tomboy, a bit of sass and a large dash of confidence. Wildfang is more than a retailer of clothes – it’s a movement dedicated to women, created by women.

Born to be a Wildfang: Bamboo Spark and Relentless Hustle

Swings, carving walls and sprinkles of the color green bring the Wildfang retail space in Portland to life. These touches of whimsy make the space comfortable and collaborative, and showcase a dedication to detail that is part of the brands secret sauce.

Most of the store is custom and made to move with the events that the Wildfang crew holds often. What makes someone a Wildfang? A touch of tomboy, a bit of sass and a large dash of confidence. Wildfang is more than a retailer of clothes – it’s a movement dedicated to women, created by women. Founder and CEO Emma McIlroy explains, “We don’t mind if you just stop by the store to say hi and have a Pabst beer with us. We know that you’ll remember us later, and recommend us to friends. The name of the game is longevity and we’re here to stay.”

Relentless Hustle

Relentless hustle is the name of the game for this dedicated entrepreneur.  When asked how she took a business idea and turned it into a success, McIlroy answered simply: focus on core competencies. “At Wildfang, do three things really well: content, collaboration and stores. We create quality blogs, viral campaigns and imagery by listening to our customer’s conversations and watching for trends. We can pivot quickly with partners because our small team is nimble, allowing us to create new lines as inspiration strikes. We can make a store come to life faster and on a tighter budget than others because we utilize our community to create the space.” McIlroy’s palpable confidence transfers to her unstoppable team. Wildfang started with the flicker of inspiration that two women (McIlroy and her co-founder Julia Parsley) had when they were out shopping and couldn’t find clothes that suited their style or fit.

The dynamic duo knew they couldn’t be the only people interested in tomboy chic, and their market research backed up their impression. Since that day, Wildfang has grown into a team of 21, expanded to two retail fronts and gained worldwide distribution on their popular e-store, featuring a blog dedicated to the feminist in all of us. To keep moving forward, Wildfang staff continually refine their workflow “We believe in the power of analog. Most of our brainstorms are done that way. You can’t build a brand without something tangible,” explained McIllroy when asked about the usefulness of Bamboo Spark for a business on the go. “We can share notes and sketches from the road, or simply from the other store,” she continued. Taralyn Thuot, Wildfang’s Creative Director, chimed in, “We are creating so much content and we need to stay organized. With Bamboo Spark, I can make shot lists or sketch looks quickly and share with the touch of a button. This is crucial with tight timelines and a small team. There is no time to waste.”

 

From inception, the Wildfang crew knew that social media and partnerships were going to be an important part of building a brand. “A lot of our content is actually consumer street style,” says Thuot. “Some of our best ideas have come from taking something that a Wildfang friend has shared and turning into something that anyone can wear.” This inclusive nature is working, and in turn the name Wildfang is spreading rapidly. McIllroy and team continue to focus on community, “We’ve been fortunate with ambassadors. They come from many walks of life, and all of our relationships are true and organic.” Whether a soccer player like Megan Rapinoe or a rock star like Janelle Monae, or a Wildfang at heart, all are welcome to sit in the Wildfang club.
 
To shop Wildfang, click here.

To purchase or learn about Bamboo Spark, click here.

]]>
Mon, 09 May 2016 11:32:31 +100
Pixel Art Tutorial | The Watchers of the Wall http://eu.shop.wacom.eu/detail/index/sArticle/1036/sCategory/2213303 Andrew Scaife is an UK based comic writer and artist and covers the basics and details on how to build up an image in a pixel style.

The Watchers of the Wall - Pixel Art Tutorial by Andrew Scaife

Andrew Scaife is an UK based comic writer and artist and creates pixel style images. Last year he wrote a tutorial for a pixel art drawing of The Walking Dead. He covered the basics of how to build up an image in a pixel style. For those who haven’t read it, here is a a super-quick summary:

How to make pixel art:

• Create a file in Photoshop with a really small canvas. I use 320x200 pixels. 
• Use the Pencil tool so your brush strokes have hard edges.
• Draw your image using layers to build up the image and add variety of tone and shading (I’ll go into more detail about this below).
• When you’re finished enlarge your image to the desired size, making sure to select Nearest Neighbor (hard edges) from the drop down menu.

In the following tutorial Andrew will go more into detail about the specific methods on creating pixel art, as well as some of his thoughts about how to use colour. He uses an Intuos Pro (M) and Photoshop CC.

The art work is also included in Andrew´s new book, "Point & Click", where he takes episodes of hisfavourite TV shows and re-imagines them as classic point and click adventure games.

Getting started:

Each of the drawings starts with a rough sketch. At this stage you are trying to work out the composition and all of the basic shapes. Andrew uses the pressure sensitivity on the Intuos to keep it loose.


Image 1 - sketch

Once you are happy, start to fill in the shapes with rough colours. Put each shape into a different layer, starting at the back of the picture i.e. sky, then ground, tree, ice wall, wooden lookout etc. This image has 15 layers in it so far.


Image 1 - flats

Andrew likes to use many layers, because it gives me more control over all the different elements.

At this stage, the colours don’t really matter. You will be working on Clipping Layers to finalise the colours and add shading.

Clipping Layers:

Set up around 4-5 layers on top of each of the existing layers. Make the Clipping Layers by right clicking on them and selecting ‘Create Clipping Mask’. 

Anything you draw in these Clipping Mask layers will only show within the boundaries of the basic shape on the original layer. This is great as you can work fast and loose without worrying about going over the edges.

Normal, Multiply and Overlay Layers:

There are many types of setting you can use for your layers. These are the three Andrew uses the most.

Normal: This is the most basic. It’s just a normal layer, nothing fancy. Everything you draw will show up over the top of the layer below it. Use this layer to start trying to work out the tones of image. In this image you are looking at the effect that different light has on the objects in the picture. Andrew will explain this in greater detail further down. This image only includes the Normal layers.


Image 3 – normal layers

Multiply: Use this setting to add shadows. If you set the layer to Multiply and then drop the opacity to around 35%, you can draw over your image using black and it will darken the existing colours. You can use the pressure sensitivity on the Intuos to blend as needed. You don’t need to just have one Multiply layer. "I normally have 2-3 as I build up the shadows.": Andrew says.
This image includes the Normal and Multiply layers.


Image 4 – multiply layers

Overlay: This does the opposite to the Mulitply layers. By drawing with white, you can lighten the colour in the layers beneath. You can use this to add highlights or general glow to larger areas. This image includes the Normal, Multiply and Overlay layers.


Image 5 – overlay layers

Build up these different types of layers until you are happy. There’s 82 layers in this picture. It sometimes helps to group your layers into folders so they’re easier to manage.

Colour:

"I’ve never studied colour theory, not out of any sense of willful ignorance. I know I could learn a lot beyond looking at a colour wheel and matching complementary colours etc.": Andew says. 

"However, I think everyone knows when something doesn’t look correct, even if they can’t explain why. The great thing about the proliferation in photo apps and filters is that they give everyone the opportunity to play around with their pictures and change colours in interesting ways.

And what you notice is that even if you add a filter to your selfie that makes your skin look blue, it still looks like skin. Our eyes still read that as correct, based on all the other things in the image and that the blue filter also impacts the colour of hair or the wallpaper in the background.

My biggest tip for colouring is to use photo references. These references don’t have to be of the image you’re drawing. It could be any image where the colour scheme appeals to you. Keep a folder of reference photos that you can draw upon. I always have an idea of how I’d like an image to look i.e. warm, stark, muted etc. Part of my process is to research photos to find one that has the feeling I’m looking for. It’s often drawn from my own snapshots. I’ll load an image into Photoshop and use the Eyedropper tool to select my colours."

Light:

In this image there are two competing light sources. The blue light of the moon on the left and the golden yellow light of the torches on the right. In the next image Andrew takes you through the process of colouring the wooden look-out.


1-6 step by step process

1. This is the base layer. It’s all one colour, which might be the case if it’s under flat sunlight.
2. This is a Normal layer. Andrew used his reference pictures to see what colour this wooden frame looks like under the blue moonlight or against the torchlight. It still doesn’t need to be perfect; you can change it later if needed.
3. This is your first Multiply layer set to 35% opacity. Using black to add some of the larger mid-tone shadows.
4. This is another Multiply set to 35% opacity. Repeat the above, but now the lines are darker so you can add more detail and deeper shadows.
5. This is an Overlay layer set to 45% opacity. Use white to add highlights on the left and more of a glow on the right.
6. This is what it looks like if you remove the Normal layer from point 2. You can see the shading looks OK but it doesn’t fit with the rest of the image.

Once the background is complete it’s time to work on the character. This always takes longer than you think. "I’m using loose pixels around the collar to suggest fur and ‘fly-away’ hair.": Andrew says.


Character

The final stage is adding in the text and inventory. And then you´re done!


Watchers on the Wall

Point + Click

Andrew´s book is available now from Comicsy.

Follow Andrew on Facebook | Twitter | Tumblr

]]>
Tue, 26 Apr 2016 15:12:33 +100
Inking Digitally | Tips & Tricks by Mikiko http://eu.shop.wacom.eu/wacom-infochannel/inking-digitally-tips-und-tricks-by-mikiko/1032?c=2213303 Many people have a hard time inking digitally, so here is a quick introduction to digital inking by the talented and lovely Mikiko Ponczeck. Mikiko will be taking us through how to get steady lines, and some digital things that help make inking a little easier to manage.

Inking Digitally - Tips & Tricks by Mikiko

Many people have a hard time inking digitally, so here is a quick introduction to digital inking by the talented and lovely Mikiko Ponczeck. Mikiko will be taking us through how to get steady lines, and some digital things that help make inking a little easier to manage.

Before we start: you need a graphic tablet. Some people can create INSANE art work with a mouse, but trust, most professionals use a tablet. For inking, you also need pen pressure sensitivity. Mikiko uses the new Intuos Comic medium size which she likes to take with her on the road.

Step 1 - Create a sketch and scan it

Step 2 - Choose a software program for digital inking

Step 3 - Set up your tablet and assign keystrokes

Step 4 - Use layers and shadows

Lastly - Be patient

 

About Mikiko Ponczeck

Mikiko - aka Zombiesmile - is a comic, manga and game artist. Illustrator and aspiring catlady.

Due to her father's line of work, Mikiko has moved a lot in her childhood, which resulted in her growing up learning many languages and living in places such as Hong Kong and Brussels.
In 1999 she moved to Germany, where she finished school. Together with American concept and comic artist Shaun Healey, she visited the 2010 SMASH! Convention in Sydney as guests of honour.

More about Mikiko and her work:
DeviantArt
Facebook @Mikiko
Instagram @mikikoponczeck
Twitter @Zombiesmile
Tumblr

]]>
Sun, 20 Mar 2016 16:05:20 +100
Life hacks | Never Start with a Blank Page: Hacks for Students who Love Procr... http://eu.shop.wacom.eu/detail/index/sArticle/1031/sCategory/2213303 You´re so bombarded with info and stuff to do from every direction that you’re totally out of bandwidth. The good news is that you don’t have to feel so overwhelmed. You can be crazy productive, and that phone in your pocket is going to be a key part of the solution.

Never Start with a Blank Page: Hacks for Students who Love Procrastinating

Information overload. You have it. With your phone as your ever-present sidekick, you’re off at classes, working on assignments and trying to have a life outside of school. That’s a lot of stuff to juggle and sometimes prioritizing your tasks is so overwhelming you end up procrastinating or blowing deadlines altogether. Not good!

What’s happening is that you’re so bombarded with info and stuff to do from every direction that you’re totally out of bandwidth. The good news is that you don’t have to feel so overwhelmed. You can be crazy productive, and that phone in your pocket is going to be a key part of the solution.

Take notes. Lots of notes!

Everyone knows how taking notes can help us stay organized and on top of our to-do lists. It’s impossible to keep everything in our heads, but when we record things down it gives thoughts, tasks and information a place to land, freeing up headspace and allowing us to focus on what we need to do in the current moment. It’s a lot easier to retain information when our brains aren’t busy trying to keep 9 billion things going at the same time.

What many people don’t know is that using actual pen and paper is a big secret to this whole deal. The physical act of writing automatically helps us remember things better by activating different areas of our brains. Recording things the old fashioned way seems, well, “old fashioned,” but it absolutely works.

Plan when and where to work

So you’ve wisely decided that lists are your new BFF. You’re making a list of everything, and even breaking them down into where and when you’re going to tackle a task. By planning things out in advance, you’ll get way more done in less time because you’re organized and focused. You just have to make sure you follow your plan and set realistic goals.

For example, instead of saying “At 2:00pm at the library, write 1,000 word essay on the mating habits of giant squid,” plan to do only a small chunk of that essay by breaking it up into 250 word sessions four times. It’s more manageable, less daunting, and you’ll be coming back to your essay with a fresh mind every time. That sounds way better than trying to bang it all out in one sitting, right? You’re pretty much guaranteed to crush it this way. Spreading out the load depends on planning!

Keep class notes organized

Remember what we said earlier about how writing things out longhand helps your memory? Not only will it help you remember your assignments and ideas, but you’ll recall more of what was said in class as well. 

Here’s where your phone comes in handy if you use it in conjunction with your Bamboo Spark. All of these class notes and organizational “to do” lists can be transferred from your notepad to your phone with the push of a single button. You can convert them to plain text with a Wacom Cloud account, store them in Dropbox, add them to OneNote, email them, whatever you need to do. Suddenly having your longhand notes with you is really convenient since you don’t have to lug around a big clunky spiral-bound notebook to review them! When you catch a few moments waiting for your friends to show up at the cafe, just whip out your phone and get your study on.

Never start with a blank page

So with your easy and handy access to your notes you’ve aced your tests. Well done! But the semester isn’t over yet. Next up: the dreaded term paper.

Starting a paper with an empty word doc staring at you is tough. To get the ideas flowing, try sketchnoting. Not only is it fun to use visual thinking to help generate ideas and sort out problems, but it’s the perfect way to prepare for writing since it’s a very deliberate act.

Use your class notes or reading notes to your advantage. Go back through the notes you took on your Bamboo Spark, search for the ones you need, then with your Wacom Cloud account, convert your handwritten notes to plain text. Copy and paste them into word and/or OneNote, delete all of the things you don’t need, and you’re left with the foundation of your paper. Now all you need to do is fill in the blanks. Pro tip: when you copy and paste quotes or facts from websites in OneNote, the source URL is included in your notes.

When you’re using a ballpoint pen and putting it to real paper, you have to think a lot more about what you’re sketching out. This ink is permanent! So your brain is working on a different level and is more engaged than it would be if you were just pushing buttons on your laptop keyboard. Your thoughts will be more developed and fleshed out, and when it does come time to bang the keys your actual writing will go faster and be more cohesive as a result. Boom!

]]>
Thu, 17 Mar 2016 14:20:57 +100