Wacom eStore - official Onlinestore Wacom InfoChannel http://eu.shop.wacom.eu/wacom-infochannel?p=4 2017-11-20T03:11:19Z Tutorials | ZBrushCore Tutorial with Steve James - Part 5, Hair http://eu.shop.wacom.eu/wacom-infochannel/tutorials-zbrushcore-tutorial-with-steve-james-part-5-hair/1077?c=2213303 Professional 3D artist Steve James, from Pixologic, recorded these amazing video tutorials to show you how to sculpt a head using ZBrushCore. He will go through the benefits of integrating 3D into his workflow and breaks down the steps he will be showing you in this series.

ZBrushCore Video Tutorial Series with Steve James

Professional 3D artist Steve James, from Pixologic, recorded these amazing video tutorials to show you how to sculpt a head using ZBrushCore. He will go through the benefits of integrating 3D into his workflow and breaks down the steps he will be showing you in this series.

This series has 6 parts and in this fifth part, you will create the hair. While sculpting, Steve uses a tool which makes ZBrush special, called DynaMesh. Keep this in mind, because you will be using it a lot ;).

Part 5, Hair

We will first show you the video for context. The steps are written out below the video. 

 

There are many ways to sculpt hair. With this method we will insert a sphere and use this as a base.

Major shape

1. First insert a new sphere into our list of objects.

2. Press X on the keyboard to make sure that symmetry is activated.

At this point, we are blocking out the major shape.

3. Turn on DynaMesh and drag out a rectangle to DynaMesh the model.

4. Use the Inflate brush to add volume to the hair.

Middle part

5. Turn the model to see the top. Let´s define the hair middle part.

6. Use the Dam standard brush to draw our a part in the hair.

7. Use the Move brush to pull the hair to the side. Keep in mind where you want to place the part.

8. Use the Dam Standard brush to define the front edges of the hair.

Styling

Since it is stylised hair, have fun with it and find good shapes.

9. From the side, define major clumps in the hair with the Dam standard brush.

10. From the part pull it down and follow the forms of the Mesh.

11. Rotate the model for the best possible view. And pull down lines from the part.

At this point you can be really creative and create nice flowing shapes. Make your way around the head, always starting from the part. Think about how the hair flows down from the head.

12. Check the model for areas of the Mesh that would benefit for additional clumps of hair.

Weight

Let´s now add weight to the hair.

13. Select the Move brush and start pulling the hair into shape. Think about how gravity would affect the hair. Pull the hair along the bottom and create interesting curves.

14. Use the Dam standard brush to emphasize additional edges.

15. Continue shaping the hair with the Move Brush. Clean up the clumps of hair.

16. Select the Dynamic Trim brush. Go around the model and knock down the high point between the lines. This will help eleminate a buldgy look.

17. Continue to refine the shape of the hair with the Move brush. Pull in the bangs and shape the flow hair on the sides.

18. Go back and emphesize the part with the Dam Standard brush. Lightly press down on the model until you can see the head through the hair.

19. Check the model and use the Dam Standard brush for areas you want to emphesize.

20. Use the Clay polish button, or turn polish on DynaMesh to make crisper forms.

Clothing

Let´s go over how to create simple clothing, using the extract feature.

21. In the subtool menu, make sure the character model is selected.

22. Use the Inflate brush to add volume to the chest.

23. Hold down Ctrl and draw out the area where the shirt will be.

24. To erase part of the mask, hold down Ctrl and Alt at the same time.

25. Hit the extract button to get a preview of what the extracted Mesh will look like. If you like, hit the accept button below the extract button.

]]>
Wed, 30 Nov 2016 15:34:18 +100
Tutorials | ZBrushCore Tutorial with Steve James - Part 4, Mouth http://eu.shop.wacom.eu/wacom-infochannel/tutorials-zbrushcore-tutorial-with-steve-james-part-4-mouth/1076?c=2213303 Professional 3D artist Steve James, from Pixologic, recorded these amazing video tutorials to show you how to sculpt a head using ZBrushCore. He will go through the benefits of integrating 3D into his workflow and breaks down the steps he will be showing you in this series.

ZBrushCore Video Tutorial Series with Steve James

Professional 3D artist Steve James, from Pixologic, recorded these amazing video tutorials to show you how to sculpt a head using ZBrushCore. He will go through the benefits of integrating 3D into his workflow and breaks down the steps he will be showing you in this series.

This series has 6 parts and in this fourth part, you will create the mouth. While sculpting, Steve uses a tool which makes ZBrush special, called DynaMesh. Keep this in mind, because you will be using it a lot ;).

Part 4, Mouth

We will first show you the video for context. The steps are written out below the video. 

Teeth

1. In the Tools pallet, select the Cilinder Primitive.

2. Open the Initialize pallet and pull up the inner radius slider until it looks like a tube.

3. Click the Make polyMesh 3D button.

4. Select the Move tool by pushing W on the keyboard. And draw out a line, starting from the bottom of the cilinder.

5. Select the top yellow circle and pull the top of the cilinder down.

6. Hold down Ctrl and Shift to draw out a selection box. And hold down Alt to create an inverse selection.

7. Go to Geometry menu, open the Modify Topology sub-pallet and click on Delete hidden.

8. Select the Move tool by pressing W and draw out a line anywhere.

9. Hold down Ctrl and click on the middle circle. As you drag down, it will duplicate the object.

10. Draw out the Move tool, click in the middle circle and move the teeth slightly backwards.

11. To insert the set of teeth into the base Mesh, open the Subtool pallet. Click on the insert button, this will add the teeth to our list of objects.

12. Resize the teeth using the Scale tool. Select the scale tool by pushing E on the keyboard and draw out a line from the center of the teeth.

13. Click on the last yellow circle on the line and pull it inward. Do this until the teeth are the correct size.

14. Push R on the keyboard to activate the Rotation tool, draw out a line and rotate the teeth slightly.

15. Push W to activate the Move tool, click in the center of the middle circle and move the teeth into place.

Having the teeth as part of the model now will help us sculpt the lips in the proper place.

Lips

16. Select the base Mesh in the Subtool menu.

17. Pull out the lips slightly with the Move brush. When holding down Alt using the Move brush, it will pull the Mesh out.

18. Select the Dam standard brush and start to define the upper edge of the lip.

19. Do the same thing with the lower lip.

20. Use the Inflate brush to give the lips volume.

21. Use the Move brush to move the lips the lips around slightly.

22. DynaMesh the model with Polish on.

Chin & creases

23. Use the Move brush to pull out the chin.

24. Increase the brush size and use the inflate brush to give more volume to the lips.

25. You can use the Move brush to make subtle tweaks to the Mesh.

26. Go over the lips with the Dam standard brush to make creases in top and lower lip.

27. With the same brush, define the top of the chin.

28. Use the Smooth brush to soften the edge.
Notice how DynaMesh, with Polish on, crisps up those edges.

Cheeks & lines

29. Use the Dam standard brush to pull a line from the corner of the mouth.

30. Use the Inflate brush to give volume to the corners and cheeks.

Redefine facial features

31. Check the entire model to see how different facial features interact with each other. For example, redefine the areas of the nose.

32. Use the Inflate to give more volume to the ball of the nose. And hold down Alt to redefine the nostrils.

33. Turn the model to the side and use the Move brush and pull the nose around a little.

You can sub-devide the model twice.

34. Use the Dam standard brush to refine the edges. Go over the nose, ears and the eyes. Make sure the edges are nice and crisp.

35. Look over the model and check for areas that need fixing.
For example, the nostrils are a little too round so use the move brush to pull it up slightly.

36. Use inflate to add more volume to the chin.

37. Some details of the ear need to be redefined. Use the Dam standard brush to redefine the helix and the antihelix.

Added features

38. For fun, you can add a dip for a pierced ear hole. Use the dam standard brush to go over the lids. And use the Move tool to make some tweaks.

39. Make some adjustments to the size of the eyes. Also pull the nose wider.

These are subtle changes but make your model come together.

40. To finish things of, use the Dam standard brush to give a hint of jaw line.

41. You can also add other details to the body. First the Sternocleidomastoid, the muscle that turns the head. It starts at the ear and attaches around the collar bone.

42. Hold down Ctrl and draw out a mask, use the Inflate brush to give the area volume. You can lower the sub devision level to make it smoother. Clear the mask and smooth out the area.

43. Do the same thing to make a subtle clavicle. Hold Ctrl to mask the area. Invert the mask and use Inflate brush to give it volume. Clear the mask and mooth it all out.

44. Check the model and smooth out any rough spots.

45. Use the Dam standard brush to pull that subtle crease down the side of the nose.

46. Finally use the Dam standard brush to add a slight dip in the corner of the eye.

This completes the head sculpt.

]]>
Thu, 24 Nov 2016 17:04:43 +100
Tutorials | How To Draw A Nose From The Front http://eu.shop.wacom.eu/wacom-infochannel/tutorials-how-to-draw-a-nose-from-the-front/1075?c=2213303 In this tutorial, Canadian portrait artist, Darlene Nguyen demonstrates a technique for drawing a nose from the front, breaking the process down to seven simple steps.

How to draw a nose from the front

There is no doubt that noses can be difficult to draw, but if you break them down into smaller sections, you'll find that they are not so intimidating after all!
Canadian portrait artist, Darlene Nguyen from Rapid Fire Art, uses a variety of mediums and materials to create fun, unique pieces of art. 

In this tutorial, she demonstrates a technique for drawing a nose from the front, breaking the process down to seven simple steps.

In the diagram below, the nose is broken down into 3 main sections: bridge, ball and nostrils. We will use simple shapes and forms as guidelines to construct a nose while maintaining a high level of symmetry.

Step 1:

Create a new layer and name it "Guidelines". Starting with the ball of the nose, draw a circle. Add the bridge by drawing two curved lines on each side.

Step 2:

Draw a horizontal line through the middle of the circle and create guidelines for the nostrils by drawing a diamond shape that wraps around the base of the nose.

Step 3:

Create a new layer, place it at the top and name it “Shading”. Shade around the inner part of the circle and the outer parts of the bridge until you get a long "U" shape. At the top between the junction of the nose and brow bone, expand your shading outwards and fade out gradually.

Step 4:

Use the diamond shape as a guideline to draw the nostrils. Now it's really starting to come together!

Step 5:

Shade around the nostrils while leaving some space for the highlights.

Step 6: 

Now it's time to shape and contour the ball and bridge. To make the nose look taller, darken the area around the circle and shade along the top. To make it lookflatter shade the middle of the circle. Add an additional layer of shading along the bridge to soften out the features.

Step 7:

From your toolbox, use the smudge tool to give the nose a softer look. Then select an easer with a low opacity to redefine highlights along the bridge, tip of the nose and side of the nostrils.

To draw different types of noses, adjust the size of the circle, width or length of the bridge and try different diamond shapes! Experiment with your shading toachieve taller, flatter, highly angular or defined noses. The possibilities are endless!

Want more tutorials?

Visit the Rapid Fire Art website where you'll find many tutorials - many of them free - in which Darlene shows you how to create realistic portraits in an easy-to-follow, step-by-step process like the tutorial above. You'll learn how to draw the individual facial features - eyes, nose, mouth and hair, as well as get tips on shading and composition.

Also, be sure to check out Darlene's mesmerizing speed drawings using traditional media on her YouTube channel.

Rapid Fire Art website
YouTube
Facebook

]]>
Tue, 22 Nov 2016 11:13:56 +100
Tutorials | ZBrushCore Tutorial with Steve James - Part 3, Nose & Ears http://eu.shop.wacom.eu/wacom-infochannel/tutorials-zbrushcore-tutorial-with-steve-james-part-3-nose-und-ears/1074?c=2213303 Professional 3D artist Steve James, from Pixologic, recorded these amazing video tutorials to show you how to sculpt a head using ZBrushCore. He will go through the benefits of integrating 3D into his workflow and breaks down the steps he will be showing you in this series.

ZBrushCore Video Tutorial Series with Steve James

Professional 3D artist Steve James, from Pixologic, recorded these amazing video tutorials to show you how to sculpt a head using ZBrushCore. He will go through the benefits of integrating 3D into his workflow and breaks down the steps he will be showing you in this series.

This series has 6 parts and in this third part, you will create the nose and ears. While sculpting, Steve uses a tool which makes ZBrush special, called DynaMesh. Keep this in mind, because you will be using it a lot ;).

Part 3, Nose & Ears

We will first show you the video for context. The steps are written out below the video. 

 

Let´s go over sculpting the nose and the ear.

Nose

1. Start by shaping the profile of the nose from the side.

2. Select the Move brush and pull the nose to the correct shape. Also shape the nose from the front view.

Wings

3. To create the wings of the nose, hold down Ctrl and mask out a small circle on the side.

4. Tap inside the middle of the mask to soften it and Ctrl click on the canvas to invert the mask.

5. With the Inflate brush, give volume to the sides of the nose.

6. With the Dam standard brush, define the edge of the nose.

Nasolabial fold

7. Make a small line, describing the nasolabial fold. To make a character look younger, make sure to smooth this out.

Nostril

8. Hold down Ctrl and make a small mask where the nostrils go. Ctrl click on the canvas to invert the mask.

9. Use the Inflate brush to make a slight nostril. DynaMesh the object and smooth out the nostrils.

10. Use the Move brush to shape the nose. Be sure to look at it from the side and the front.

Ear

Let´s now start sculpting the ear. The ear is composed of three major parts and some details.

11. We need more detail for this Mesh so pull the DynaMesh slider up to 200.

Ear helix

12. Hold down Ctrl and draw a mask where the helix goes. Ctrl tap on the mask to soften it.

13. Use the Move brush to pull the helix out from the base of the ear. And use DynaMesh and smooth out the area.

14. Use the Inflate brush to give volume to the helix.

Ear lobule

15. Mask out a small area where the lobule will be and invert the mask.

16. Use the Move and Inflate brush to create the ear lobule.

17. Use the Dam standard brush to define the edge of the helix.

Ear hole

18. Create another mask where the ear hole will go.

19. Invert the mask, use the Inflate brush and hold down Alt to create the hole.

Helix curves and antihelix

20. With the Dam standard brush, define the front of the ear and the edge of the helix.

21. Hold Ctrl and mask out the area where the helix curves over. Soften and invert the mask.

22. Hold down Alt and use the Inflate brush to create the edge of the helix.

23. Hold Shift and smooth out the inner part of the ear.

24. Mask out the area where the antihelix will go.

25. Use the Inflate brush to give the antihelix some volume.

Tragus and antitragus

26. Hold down Alt and with the Inflate brush create a little nodge up at the top.

27. Use the Move brush to pull out the tragus and antitragus.

28. You can DynaMesh the object any time you have a major change in form.

29. Finally use the Move brush to shape the ear and the Dam standard brush to pull out any details.
When the ear is a too big, use the Move brush to resize it.

]]>
Wed, 16 Nov 2016 17:47:09 +100
Personalize Your Daily Digital Communication With The New Bamboo Fineline http://eu.shop.wacom.eu/wacom-infochannel/personalize-your-daily-digital-communication-with-the-new-bamboo-fineline/1073?c=2213303 From drawing on a Snapchat pic, to handwriting and taking notes on your iPhone or iPad, our favorite apps and devices are catching up with the growing desire to personalize our digital interactions. The new Bamboo Fineline is the perfect tool to add that personal touch by offe...

Personalize Your Daily Digital Communication With The New Bamboo Fineline

From drawing on a Snapchat pic, to handwriting and taking notes on your iPhone or iPad, our favorite apps and devices are catching up with the growing desire to personalize our digital interactions. The new Bamboo Fineline is the perfect tool to add that personal touch by offering an effortless and natural writing experience on our favorite touchscreen devices. 

Our handwriting is our fingerprint on the world. It’s our way of making our mark. And yet our day-to-day digital communications are stuck in Calibri typeface and Power Point SmartArt. Bamboo Fineline is ideal for those who want to up their digital game. The fine tip smart stylus announced today is the third generation Wacom specifically designed for iOS. Paired with a compatible app on a Bluetooth® enabled iPad or iPhone, Bamboo Fineline offers improved precision, palm rejection and pressure sensitivity while the customizable shortcut button allows quick access to a range of functions.

Bamboo Fineline is the premium pen for the person on your list who transitions from sketch noting, note taking and visual communication at work, to DIY projects like hand lettering, calligraphy or sketching at home,” says Mike Gay, Senior Vice President for Wacom’s consumer products business unit. The stylus has been fully integrated into leading note taking and sketching apps including Goodnotes, ZoomNotes, Autodesk SketchBook, Concepts, and Bamboo Paper. More apps like ArtRage, MediBang Paint, NotesPlus, and Noteshelf are coming soon.

For the Techy Trekker: Bamboo Omni

Wacom’s range of fine tip styli also includes the Bamboo Omni announced earlier this year. This smart pen works on most iOS and Android touchscreen devices and offers a fast, mobile handwriting solution to anyone who wants to personalize their digital work and play. Bamboo Omni is perfect for those who transition from their phones to their tablets over the course of a day, an hour, or a minute. Turn on the Omni and you’re ready to mark up a PDF, add your signature, or add your artistic touch to a WhatsApp, Facebook or SnapChat pic.

Pricing and Availability

Bamboo Fineline is compatible with all iPad generations from the iPad 3 onwards, including iPad Air and iPad Mini (excludes 9.7 in iPad Pro) and introduces the Wacom quality fine tip pen experience to the iPhone 7 and the iPhone 7 Plus. The stylus is priced at $59.95 (USD), €59.90 (EUR)* and £39.99 (GBP)* and will be available for everyone on your Christmas list on Wacom’s online store in select regions and select retailers starting in late November. Click here to learn more.

Bamboo Omni is compatible with most touchscreen devices. It is priced at $49.95 (USD) €49.90 (EUR)* and £41.93 (GBP)* and will be available on Wacom’s online store in select regions and select retailers starting in November. Click here to learn more.

Watch the product trailer:

]]>
Wed, 16 Nov 2016 10:31:10 +100
Tutorials | ZBrushCore Tutorial with Steve James - Part 2, Eyes http://eu.shop.wacom.eu/detail/index/sArticle/1072/sCategory/2213303 Professional 3D artist Steve James, from Pixologic, will take you through the steps of sculpting a head using ZBrushCore in this video tutorial series.

ZBrushCore Video Tutorial Series with Steve James

Professional 3D artist Steve James, from Pixologic, recorded these amazing video tutorials to show you how to sculpt a head using ZBrushCore. He will go through the benefits of integrating 3D into his workflow and breaks down the steps he will be showing you in this series.

This series has 6 parts and in this second part, you will create the eyes. While sculpting, Steve uses a tool which makes ZBrush special, called DynaMesh. Keep this in mind, because you will be using it a lot ;).

Part 2, Eyes

We will first show you the video for context. The steps are written out below the video. 

 

Let´s start detailing the base Mesh, by sculpting the eyes. To give a guide while sculpting the eyelids, insert the eyeball first.

Eyelids

1. Select the Insert Mesh brush.

2. Select M on the keyboard and make sure the sphere is selected.

3. Where the eye would go, drag down and pull down until it is about the size of an eyeball.
ZBrush will automatically mask the base Mesh.

4. Select W on the keyboard, to select the move tool.
Starting with the eye, draw out the move tool. With the center circle on the line, pull the eyeball back.

5. Rotate the head to the front view. Draw out the line again from the center of the eye. Use the center circle to move the eye into position.

6. Hold on Ctrl + Shift and click on the sphere. This will hide the base Mesh.

7. In the tools menu, open the sub-tool pallet. In the split sub-menu, push the "Split Hidden" button. This will seperate the eyeball from the base Mesh.
Then in the list of sub-tools, click on the base Mesh and continue working on that.

8. Use the solo button or the keyboard shortcut "Alt + X" to hide the eyes.

Eye sockets

9. Hold down Ctrl and draw a mask where the eyes will go. Tapping in the middle, will soften the mask.

10. Select the Inflate brush and create a buldge where the eyes go. Then hold down shift to smooth it out.

11. Hold down Ctrl and draw a mask to roughly define where the eyelids go.
Ctrl tap on the canvas to invert the mask.

12. Select the Inflate brush. Hold down Alt and push the Mesh in to define the eye socket.

13. To the side of the model, hold down Ctrl and drag a rectangle. Once to clear the mask and again to DynaMesh the model.

Defining eyelids

14. Select the Damnien standard or Dam Standard bush.
Then sculpt the upper and lower eyelids and a slight indentation above the eye.

15. Hold down Shift to smooth this area. Do this a few times to build up the form. Sculpt a little, smooth a little.

16. Use the Move brush to help shape the eye. Pull in the corner and also on the edge.
From the side, the eye will look like a wedge shape. From the front, move the Mesh around into an eye shape.

17. To clean things up, open the geometry pallet and push the Clay Polish button.

19. Increase the resolution of the DynaMesh slightly. Open the DynaMesh sub-menu and move the slider to about 150.

20. Ctrl drag to DynaMesh the model again. And select the Dam standard brush to sculpt the eyelids more.

21. You can polish the Mesh each time you DynaMesh, by pushing the Polish button in the DynaMesh sub-menu.

22. Check above and below the model to make sure that the lids follow the eyelid´s shape. If needed, use the Move brush to pull them back into position.

Eye creases

23. Use the Dam standard brush to make a slight crease above the eye.

24. Using the same brush, define the shape of the brow. Carefully sculpt the brow ridge and also the crease below.

25. Use DynaMesh with polish on, to clean up those edges.

26. Finally use the Move brush to make any tweaks.

]]>
Wed, 09 Nov 2016 00:49:31 +100
Wacom Artist Spotlight | Caricature Artist Malcolm Rebello http://eu.shop.wacom.eu/wacom-infochannel/wacom-artist-spotlight-caricature-artist-malcolm-rebello/1071?c=2213303 We at Wacom value our community and the artists who use our products. So it seems only natural that we would feature you guys to thank you for all your love and support! This month Wacom features Malcolm Rebello, a Goa based very talented Caricature artist.

Wacom Artist Spotlight - Caricature Artist Malcolm Rebello

We at Wacom value our community and the artists who use our products. So it seems only natural that we would feature you guys to thank you for all your love and support!

This month Wacom features Malcolm Rebello, a Goa based very talented illustrator and  a caricature artist.

Malcolm writes:

“Born and brought up in India’s smallest state, Goa. I've graduated from Goa College of Art, specializing in Illustration, holder of ‘Historian Vinayak Narayan Dhume memorial award’ and a merit gold medal for illustration in 2013. I was a part of a team of caricature artists to make caricatures of Goan ‘Tiatr’ actors & singers for International Film Festival of India (IFFI) in 2012. Won state level poster competition in 2008. Got featured in POOL magazine (2016), The Goan Newspaper (2015), The Goan weekly (2013). I was a part of a team of designers for Taxi Fabric, Mumbai (2016). I was a part of 3 professional group exhibitions. Co-founded an online Design store for Goa called icescrewd.com in 2015, where t-shirts, badges, lamp shades, vinyl and framed caricatures are up for sale.

I have been freelancing for people, organizations, design labels, event companies for more than 10 years and currently working for Cognizant Technology Solutions, Pune. I have been experimenting in both Digital and Traditional hand drawn media. To name a few of my ongoing self funded projects are:'Book of spells' Its a series of hand painted surreal artworks. 'Spiral Diary of Faces' is a series of pencil caricatures done of the people around me. I'm mostly known for my Digital caricatures, and my works are bought by many known faces, including Sanjay Dutt (Bollywood Celebrity).

Other than art, I keep my self preoccupied playing for an Indie-pop band in Pune.My Father bought me a Wacom Bamboo tablet in 2011 and since then I have been experimenting digitally, doing caricatures, posters, doodles, animations etc. It gave me extreme freedom to get the traditional drawing feel on a digital platform and I use it till date.  I use Adobe Photoshop, Illustrator, After effects, Premier, Flash.

I have tried Wacom Intuos and Cintiq 27" and its amazing to see the endless possibilities in digital art. My honest observation is that the only thing that makes professionals go for a different brand is because Wacom Tablet price ranges are on the costlier side than their competitors, but as far as quality and trust is concerned Wacom is right on top, and is used by almost every art professional.” 

If you’d like to see more of his work you can visit his online pages below:
Behance
MyArtFolio
Instagram
Facebook

]]>
Tue, 08 Nov 2016 21:24:57 +100
Product Launch | Create Directly on Screen With Our Most Natural Pen Experien... http://eu.shop.wacom.eu/wacom-infochannel/product-launch-create-directly-on-screen-with-our-most-natural-pen-experience-ever/1070?c=2213303 For professional artists and designers who want to add a world-class pen-on-screen creative experience to their Mac or PC, Wacom Cintiq Pro offers Wacom’s most powerful array of capabilities in a creative pen display.

Create directly on screen with our most natural pen experience ever

For professional artists and designers who want to add a world-class pen-on-screen creative experience to their Mac or PC, Wacom Cintiq Pro offers Wacom’s most powerful array of capabilities in a creative pen display. Featuring the Wacom Pro Pen 2 with 4x increased pen accuracy and pressure sensitivity (compared with Wacom Pro Pen), high display resolution and color performance, and multi-touch control.

Both the Wacom Cintiq Pro 13 (13.3” display) and the Wacom Cintiq Pro 16 (15.6” display) also feature a beautiful new design with an etched-glass screen and an integrated stand for working at an inclined angle. Wacom Cintiq Pro works with your favorite 2D and 3D creative software to give you the authentic feel, accuracy and control to create anything that you can imagine.

We'll be updating everyone with pricing and availability soon. You can sign up to get notified right away, right here.

Your partner in breakthrough creativity

With years of experience developing and innovating creative pen displays for professional art and design, Wacom developed the Wacom Cintiq Pro to inspire and support artists as they strive to do their very best work.  

The new Wacom Pro Pen 2 gives you Wacom’s most accurate and advanced pen performancewith 4x higher pen accuracy and pressure sensitivity, outstanding pen-tilt response and virtually lag-free tracking. The feel of using the pen on the etched-glass screen provides an authentic drawing experience and exceptional control for creative work. The new displays let you see your artwork in perfect detail with up to 4K resolution and exceptionally high 94% Adobe RGB color performance.

Intuitive multi-touch gestures speed your workflow, letting you zoom, pan and navigate with a sweep of your fingers.  You can also customize your workflow with programmable on-screen Radial Menus, and pen side switches or you can add the ExpressKey™ Remote (sold separately) for additional shortcut keys and navigational controls.

Cintiq Pro is also integrated into your workflow using other Wacom products, software and services. Download the Inkspace™ application to benefit from valuable services such as Wacom Echo to protect your precious creative work from loss by automatically storing a back-up in the Wacom Cloud.

The Cintiq that’s right for you  

Both sizes of Cintiq Pro are designed specifically for the needs of creative users. Choose the larger Cintiq Pro 16 for additional space to work and higher resolution and color performance, or the more compact Cintiq Pro 13 that blends performance with easy portability - from computer to computer or place to place.

Wacom Cintiq Pro is flexible and has valuable accessory options (sold separately) to customize it for your unique creative needs. The Wacom Color Manager helps you calibrate your display for use in color critical workflows. The Wacom Stand provides two additional working angles and folds flat for easy transport. The Wacom ExpressKey™ Remote puts precious time-saving shortcuts atyour fingertips.

Experience the joy of creating with the new Wacom Cintiq Pro!

]]>
Thu, 03 Nov 2016 02:15:35 +100
Mikiko´s infographic for our new Bamboo Slate http://eu.shop.wacom.eu/wacom-infochannel/mikikos-infographic-for-our-new-bamboo-slate/1069?c=2213303 Mikiko Ponczeck - manga-ka, teacher and illustrator - recently got one of our Bamboo Slate smartpads and wants to show you how it improves her creative process.

Mikiko´s infographic for our new Bamboo Slate

Mikiko Ponczeck - manga-ka, teacher and illustrator - recently got one of our Bamboo Slate smartpads and wants to show you how it improves her creative workflow.

]]>
Thu, 20 Oct 2016 19:12:56 +100
Tutorials | ZBrushCore Tutorial with Steve James - Part 1, Base http://eu.shop.wacom.eu/detail/index/sArticle/1068/sCategory/2213303 Professional 3D artist Steve James, from Pixologic, will take you through the steps of sculpting a head using ZBrushCore in this video tutorial series.

ZBrushCore Video Tutorial Series with Steve James

Professional 3D artist Steve James, from Pixologic, recorded these amazing video tutorials to show you how to sculpt a head using ZBrushCore. He will go through the benefits of integrating 3D into his workflow and breaks down the steps he will be showing you in this series.

This series has 6 parts and in this first part, you will start off by creating a base. Into that base you´ll sculpt the eyes, nose, ear, mouth, hair and finally color our character using PolyPaint. While sculpting, Steve uses a tool which makes ZBrush special, called DynaMesh. Keep this in mind, because you will be using it a lot ;).

Part 1, Base

We will first show you the video for context. The steps are written out below the video. 

Dynamesh

1. Turn on the wire frame to see that this sphere is composed of a Mesh.

2. Take the Move tool and pull on the Mesh. Notice that the pulled out part is more stretched out than the rest of the sphere. Use DynaMesh to fix this stretched out part.

3. Hold down Ctrl and drag a rectangle to the side of the model.

Notice how ZBrush has recalculated and the sphere has even spacing again. We will be doing this a lot, while sculpting. And don´t worry about the underlying Mesh. When using DynaMesh, ZBrush is taking care of the spacing for you.

Head

4. Just like in working with clay, you start with big shapes before focussing on the details. So start with the default DynaMesh sphere. This will be the head.

5. Select the Move brush and hit S on the keyboard to increase the brush size.

6. Pull the sphere into the shape of a skull. Narrow on the sides. Since this is going to be a female, make the jaw more narrow at the bottom. 

Eyes

7. To create the eye sockets, select the Inflate brush. Use the S key to change the size of the brush. Hold down Alt to make the Inflate brush push in. 

8. Use the Smooth brush by holding down Shift. Smooth out the sides and the bottom.

9. Turn the model to the side and select the Move brush. Pull the eyesocket back a little and smooth out the brow.

Mouth

10. Now let´s make the mouth cavity. Hold down Ctrl and draw out an oval mask for the mouth. While holding down Ctrl, tap on the canvas to invert the mask. 

11. Resize the brush and select the Inflate brush. Hold down the Alt key and push in a cavity for the mouth. 

12. Hold down the Ctrl key and drag a rectangle outside of the model, this will clear the mask. 
If you do it again, it will DynaMesh the model.

13. Hold down the Shift key and smooth out the mouth. 

14. Select Inflate and make the cavity a little bigger. Close the mouth just a little. 

15. Select the Move Brush and pull the top lip down and the bottom lip up.

Neck & shoulders

16. Now let´s contruct the body. 
Turn the sphere so you see the bottom of the head. Draw a circle at the bottom of the head. This is where we´ll extract the neck.

17. Hold down Ctrl and tap on the canvas to invert the mask.

18. Select the Move Brush, click S to resize and pull the neck from the bottom of the head. Use the Move brush to shape it like you want.

19. When ready, Ctrl drag off of the model and do it again to DynaMesh the Mesh.

20. Hold down Shift to smooth it all out.

21. Hold down Ctrl and mask the bottom of the neck. Invert the mask by holding down Ctrl and tapping on the canvas.

22. Then select the Move brush and pull the body out from the neck.

23. The geometry gets a little rough, so use DynaMesh to smooth the object.

24. And the body is looking a little thin. So select the Inflate brush to add volume to the body.

25. Lastly use the Move brush to pull the body into shape.

Ear

26. Next, mask out an ear shape on the side of the head. Hold down Ctrl and tap the canvas to invert the mask.

27. Use the rotation tool to pull out the ear like a hinch.

28. Tap R on the keyboard and draw out a line, starting at the base of the ear. Grab the last yellow dot in the circle and pull down. This should extract the ear like a hinch.

29. DynaMesh the object and pull the ear into shape. It does not need to be perfect just yet.

Nose

30. For the nose, hold down Ctrl and draw a mask in a line where the nose would be. Ctrl tap on the canvas to invert the mask.

31. Select the Move brush and pull the nose from the head. Then use the Move brush to pull it around and DynaMesh as needed.

Tune major features

At this point, you can move around the major features. And get a good feel of your character before starting with the detailed sculpting.

32. Use the Move brush to pull the mouth out slightly and move the eye sockets around.

33. Smooth and dynaMesh the object as needed.

34. Bring the shoulders down and reshape the neck. Use the Inflate brush to give a more volume to the shoulders.

35. To wrap up the base Mesh narrow the head slightly, pull out the chin and fix the ear.

]]>
Fri, 14 Oct 2016 13:31:26 +100
Tips & Tricks | How to Sculpt Hair or Fur in ZBrush http://eu.shop.wacom.eu/wacom-infochannel/tips-und-tricks-how-to-sculpt-hair-or-fur-in-zbrush/1067?c=2213303 When sculpting hair, many people will choose to use alphas. But the professor of Game Development recommends doing it manually, as it won’t have the same values and therefore be more realistic.

How to Sculpt Hair or Fur in ZBrush

Insun Kwon is Professor of Game Development at Savannah College of Art and Design in San Francisco. In the video below he is teaching us one way of sculpting hair or fur strands in ZBrush.

When sculpting hair, many people will choose to use alphas. But the professor of Game Development recommends doing it manually, as it won’t have the same values and therefore be more realistic and appealing to the audience. Using the masking tool and a selection of brushes, Kwon shows us how he designs a fur string on a rabbit.

Watch the video below for more.

]]>
Fri, 14 Oct 2016 13:08:56 +100
Digital Designers Flock to Wacom’s London Design Festival Event http://eu.shop.wacom.eu/wacom-infochannel/digital-designers-flock-to-wacoms-london-design-festival-event/1066?c=2213303 How does a 3D designer to the stars spend his working days? And how do you go from being an upstart CAD addict to working on the likes of the Dungeons and Dragons 2 movie and high profile Nike ads? Wacom hosted a night with renowned 3D modeller and digital sculptor, Glen South...

Digital Designers Flock to Wacom’s London Design Festival Event

An evening with Glen Southern, Wacom Evangelist for UK and Ireland.

How does a 3D designer to the stars spend his working days? And how do you go from being an upstart CAD addict to working on the likes of the Dungeons and Dragons 2 movie and high profile Nike ads? Wacom hosted a night with renowned 3D modeler and digital sculptor, Glen Southern, who was able to tell all.

An audience of industry peers filled the room at the Victoria and Albert Museum for a memorable event held as part of London’s prestigious Design Festival. Attendees from various sectors including 3D design, CG and gaming were on hand to hear the fascinating talk given by Glen. And with his broad expertise spanning physical and digital sculpture, there was something for everyone as Glen shared his business insight.

Among the topics of discussion was the history of digital sculpture. Glen covered the evolution of his art form from the 1990s to the present day. He talked about the early days of the design software ZBrush and how digital sculpting has changed since then. He then showcased some of his own work from ITV’s Frankenstein Chronicles, Penny Dreadful and the Last Day on Mars. Even the uninitiated in the room were familiar with the various steps of 3D sculpting aliens and monsters by the end of the evening.

But just as interesting as the 3D creations was Glen’s personal story. Starting out his career as a CAD designer, Glen followed up with training in commercial graphics/print, but then left the industry to gain a business degree. With training and development experience securely under his designer belt, Glen went on to found Southern GFX and has since then worked with some of the most talented people in the industry. 

Currently, he works for clients across a broad range of industries with the bulk of his work in broadcast television and advertising. His work has been widely acknowledged by clients and peers, including Star Wars Director JJ Abrahams who commended him on his artistic skills. 

As part of the evening, Glen shared his top tips for budding designers in the room wanting to replicate his success: 
Learn anatomy. Human and animal
Take life classes when you can (sculpting and drawing)
Love your topology (edge loops, quads vs ngons etc.)
Research the job you want to do and find out who is the best
Don’t get hung up on which software to learn

After Glen’s talk, the event continued to buzz, with digital designers trying Wacom’s Test and Learn stations, featuring the new Intuos 3D

]]>
Wed, 12 Oct 2016 15:05:14 +100