Wacom eStore - official Onlinestore Wacom InfoChannel http://eu.shop.wacom.eu/wacom-infochannel?p=2 2018-06-25T18:52:10Z Drawing a Manga Comic with Clip Studio Paint and Wacom Intuos - Part 3 http://eu.shop.wacom.eu/wacom-infochannel/drawing-a-manga-comic-with-clip-studio-paint-and-wacom-intuos/1130?c=2213303 Wacom teamed up with Celsys and professional artist Caterina Rocchi to show you the process of creating a manga comic. These videos are great for beginners who need help getting started, but the tutorial also works for more advanced artist who want to improve their comic drawi...

Part 3: 14 Steps to Drawing a Manga Comic with Clip Studio Paint and Wacom Intuos

Using Clip Studio Paint and Wacom Intuos, artist Caterina Rocchi will show you the process from sketch to final piece while creating a manga comic. Wacom teamed up with her and Celsys to give you this insider's view of manga creation.
The lovely Caterina is the owner of Lucca Manga School in Italy. In this tutorial series, she goes through the entire process of creating a manga comic and breaks it down in 13 steps.

These videos are great for beginners who need help getting started, but the tutorial also works for more advanced artist who want to improve their comic drawing skills.

So, let´s create a comic!

1) The process of creating a comic

This video is an introduction to the manga comic production workflow.

 

 

2) Creating a new canvas, resolution and layers

In this episode, we prepare a canvas to start drawing.

 

 

3) Drafting the comic

 In this episode, we draw a rough draft of your manga.

 

 

4) Text and balloons

In this episode, text is added, and speech balloons are drawn using various techniques. 

 

 

5) The Pencil tool

In this episode, we cover the [Pencil] tool which is used to draw a draft for inking.

 

 

6) Creating frames and borders

In this episode, we cover frame borders which are made by drawing frames over the draft.

 

 

7) Inking and speech bubbles

In this episode, we go over inking characters on the draft layer.

 

 

8) Background #1 of 2

A background is drawn using a perspective ruler.

 

 

9) Background #2 of 2

A background is drawn using photos and 3D data.

 

 

10) Hand-drawn text

In this episode, we´ll add hand-drawn texts such as sound effects.

 

11) Effect lines

In this episode, we cover effect lines which are drawn using tools such as Ruler.

 

12) Decoration brushes

Here we cover screen tones and adding patterns using the decoration brush.

 

13) Toning patterns and exporting

In this episode, we go over pasting screen tones, finishing up and exporting your manga comic.

 

14) Coloring a manga

This episode demonstrates the process of coloring.

 

About Clip Studio Paint and Wacom Intuos

Celsys Clip Studio Paint Pro is bundled with our new Wacom Intuos pen tablet and is the perfect 2D drawing software tool for comic and manga creation. Whether you want to simply enhance and perfect your pen-and-paper drawings or you want to experience a completely digital creative process. 

More about Caterina Rocchi

Caterina Rocchi is the owner of Lucca Manga School in Italy. She studied art in Italy and was looking for the opportunity to study Manga. So, Caterina took matters in her own hands and established a school of her own. Wacom is quite proud to be able to support this school and it´s mission.

Follow Caterina on social media:

Facebook - Instagram

She studied to draw Manga in Italy. She wanted to make the opportunity and place to study Manga for Italy so she established the school.Wacom supports this school so some WEG team might know her and the school:)
]]>
Fri, 06 Apr 2018 13:02:51 +100
Let´s get ready with Clip Studio Paint and Wacom Intuos - Part 1 http://eu.shop.wacom.eu/detail/index/sArticle/1139/sCategory/2213303 Wacom teamed up Celsys to give you an insider's view of manga comic creation from start to finish in a 5 part video tutorial series. First up, we´ll take you through the process of installing a Wacom Intuos, setting up the driver and downloading the software.

Part 1: Let´s get ready with Clip Studio Paint and Wacom Intuos

Wacom teamed up Celsys to give you an insider's view of manga comic creation from start to finish in a 5 part video tutorial series. These videos are great for beginners who need help getting started, but the tutorial also works for more advanced artist who want to improve their comic drawing skills.

First up, using Clip Studio Paint Caterina Rocchi - principle of Lucca Manga School in Italy - will help you through the process of installing your Wacom Intuos, setting up the driver and downloading the software. 

So, let´s get ready!

1) An introduction to Clip Studio Paint

This video is an introduction to what the Clip Studio Paint software has to offer.

 

 

2) Connecting the tablet

In this lesson, Caterina shows how to connect and set up the Wacom Intuos.

 

 

3) Downloading the software

This lesson demonstrates how to access and download the bundled software that comes with the Wacom Intuos.

 

 

4) Launching the software

In this video Caterina explains how to launch the Clip Studio Paint software and how to register the license.

 

 

5) Pen tablet basics and settings

This lessons explains the basic user functions of a Wacom pen tablet and how to change the driver settings.

 

6) Drawing tools

This video covers what drawing tools are available in Clip Studio Paint.

 

About Clip Studio Paint and Wacom Intuos

Celsys Clip Studio Paint Pro is bundled with our new Wacom Intuos pen tablet and is the perfect 2D drawing software tool for comic and manga creation. Whether you want to simply enhance and perfect your pen-and-paper drawings or you want to experience a completely digital creative process. 

More about Caterina Rocchi

Caterina Rocchi is the owner of Lucca Manga School in Italy. She studied art in Italy and was looking for the opportunity to study Manga. So, Caterina took matters in her own hands and established a school of her own. Wacom is quite proud to be able to support this school and it´s mission.

Follow Caterina on social media:

Facebook - Instagram

She studied to draw Manga in Italy. She wanted to make the opportunity and place to study Manga for Italy so she established the school.Wacom supports this school so some WEG team might know her and the school:)
]]>
Fri, 06 Apr 2018 13:02:51 +100
Creating an illustration with Clip Studio Paint Pro and Wacom Intuos - Part 2 http://eu.shop.wacom.eu/detail/index/sArticle/1142/sCategory/2213303 In this second part we´ll demonstrate how to create an illustration, going from a basic sketch to a finished illustration in full colour. Different colouring styles and how to use them will also be covered.

Part 2: Let´s get ready with Clip Studio Paint Pro – Creating an illustration

Wacom teamed up Celsys to give you an insider's view of manga comic creation from start to finish in a 5 part video tutorial series. These videos are great for beginners who need help getting started, but the tutorial also works for more advanced artist who want to improve their comic drawing skills.

In this second part of the series, Caterina Rocchi - principle of Lucca Manga School in Italy - will use Clip Studio Paint to demonstrate how to create an illustration, going from a basic sketch to a finished illustration in full colour. She will also explain several different colouring styles and how to do them using the program.

So, let´s get ready!

1) The process of creating an illustration.

This video will demonstrate how to create an illustration on Clip Studio Paint from sketching to colouring.

 

 

2) Creating a new canvas, drafts and sketches

In this lesson, Caterina shows how to set up Clip Studio paint to create a canvas, start a sketch and then edit it until you are satisfied.

 

 

3) Inking

This part demonstrates how to add line art to a sketch, changing the brush settings and using different layers.

 

 

4) Colouring basics: Basic anime-style painting

In this video, Caterina explains how to colour the illustration in a basic anime-style.

 

 

5) Colouring variations: Mat

Using a previously inked illustration, in this lesson Caterina demonstrates how to use different brushes to achieve a mat-like effect

 

6) Colouring variations: Watercolour

This lesson explains how to use  tools in Clip Studio Paint to achieve a watercolour-like painting style.

 

About Clip Studio Paint and Wacom Intuos

Celsys Clip Studio Paint Pro is bundled with our new Wacom Intuos pen tablet and is the perfect 2D drawing software tool for comic and manga creation. Whether you want to simply enhance and perfect your pen-and-paper drawings or you want to experience a completely digital creative process. 

More about Caterina Rocchi

Caterina Rocchi is the owner of Lucca Manga School in Italy. She studied art in Italy and was looking for the opportunity to study Manga. So, Caterina took matters in her own hands and established a school of her own. Wacom is quite proud to be able to support this school and it´s mission.

Follow Caterina on social media:

Facebook - Instagram

She studied to draw Manga in Italy. She wanted to make the opportunity and place to study Manga for Italy so she established the school.Wacom supports this school so some WEG team might know her and the school:)
]]>
Fri, 06 Apr 2018 13:02:51 +100
Stick With It | A Wacom Monthly Drawing Challenge http://eu.shop.wacom.eu/wacom-infochannel/stickwithit-a-wacom-monthly-drawing-challenge/1129?c=2213303 Wacom wants to encourage you to be creative every day. Because when you stick to it, you will gain experience. So, we´re presenting weekly prompts centered around monthly themes. You can find the planned monthly themes.

Stick With It - A Wacom monthly drawing challenge

Wacom wants to encourage you to be creative every day. Because when you stick to it, you will gain experience. So, we´re presenting weekly prompts centered around monthly themes. You can find the planned monthly themes.

Monthly themes

April — Make your work stick
May —  Wordplay
June — Soccer World Cup
July —  Emoji

Prompts of the month June: 

4 June — Make a sticker of your favorite character playing soccer
11 June — Design your own soccer team emblem as a sticker
18 June — Create a sticker of your own soccer team´s uniform
25 June — Make a sticker of a mascot for your country or favorite soccer team

The laws of the challenge

1) The 2D/3D artwork must be created by you and it has to follow the prompt of the week.
2) Hashtag your work with #WacomStickWithIt then post it to Instagram and any other social spot you like, so that we can find your work.
3) Lastly, have fun with it!

A single winner is picked at the end of each month by a panel of Wacom marketeers and Wacom influencers. Entries will be judged on both creative and technical details.

Winners will not only receive a new Wacom Intuos pen tablet and get their work displayed on Wacom´s social channels, BUT ALSO receive a StickerMule order of 50 3" X 3" die cut stickers.

T&C

For the full terms & conditions, click here.

Winners

Prompts of the month May:
1 May — Make a doodle of your mom in celebration for mother´s day
7 May — Turn your favorite pun into a doodle
14 May — Doodle your favorite inspirational quote
21 May — Doodle your favorite idiom

Winner May:

For May we picked Howard Simpson´s artwork for the idiom ´I’ve got your back´ (see image below). Not only was this  a very artistic and interesting piece of art, Howard also manage to sneak in two more idioms: ´Eyes in the back of your head´ and ´Back to back´. Congratulations Howard! 


´I´ve got your back´ idiom excecution by abbastudios

Prompts of the past month April:
2 Apr — Turn your favorite meme into a digital sticker
9 Apr — Grab your favorite sticker and redesign it
16 Apr — Create a sticker for a sticky situation
23 Apr — Show us your take on the phrase Live.Dare.Create

Winner April:

We're very excited to announce that the winner of April´s StickWithIt Wacom challenge is Mariana Paz. She made some fantastic stickers, and we particularly loved her take on the Side eyeing ´Chloe meme´ (see image below).


Mariana Paz´s take on the ´Chloe meme´


"The more you draw, the better you get".

So, are you up for the challenge?

Good luck!

]]>
Fri, 06 Apr 2018 10:12:07 +100
Stick With It - Una iniciativa Wacom para ponerte a dibujar http://eu.shop.wacom.eu/detail/index/sArticle/1144/sCategory/2213303 Nos unimos a la iniciativa Wacom ´Stick With It´ para ayudarte a no despegarte de tu arte y animarte a crear todos los días. Porque cuando creas día a día tus habilidades crecen y tus ideas fluyen más. Así que cada mes escogeremos un tema y te presentaremos una tarea creativa ...

Stick With It – Una iniciativa Wacom para ponerte a dibujar

Nos unimos a la iniciativa Wacom ´Stick With It´ para ayudarte a no despegarte de tu arte y animarte a crear todos los días. Porque cuando creas día a día tus habilidades crecen y tus ideas fluyen más. Así que cada mes escogeremos un tema y te presentaremos una tarea creativa cada semana.

Un ganador se escoge al final de cada mes y el premio consiste en una nueva Wacom Intuos, menciones en nuestras redes sociales y un set de calcomanías de StickerMule con su diseño (set de 50 3" X 3").

Temas mensuales

Junio – Fútbol 
Julio – Emojis
Agosto – Juego de palabras 
Septiembre – Regreso a clases

Tareas creativas de Junio:

12 Junio— Diseña una calcomanía de tu propio equipo de fútbol. 
18 Junio — Crea una calcomanía de tu propia camiseta de fútbol. 
25 Junio — Diseña una calcomanía de para tu equipo de fútbol favorito.

Reglas

1) El arte 2D/3D debe ser tuyo y debe seguir la tarea de la semana.
2) Debes subir tu trabajo a las redes sociales con el hashtag #WacomStickWithIt.
3) Por ultimo, diviértete.

El ganador será anunciado al final de cada mes.

T&C

Para los términos y condiciones completos, haga clic aquí.

Entonces, ¿estás preparado para el desafío?

¡Buena suerte!

]]>
Fri, 06 Apr 2018 10:12:07 +100
Wacom at the Playgrounds Festival 2018 - 30% Discount Voucher Inside http://eu.shop.wacom.eu/wacom-infochannel/wacom-at-the-playgrounds-festival-2018-30-discount-voucher-inside/1128?c=2213303 We’re extremely proud to be sponsoring yet another Playgrounds Festival event: Playgrounds Blend. We´ll be looking at the relationship between art and innovative technologies, and we’ve gathered the most talented and innovative creative professionals in animation, game, intera...

Wacom at the Playgrounds Festival 2018

We’re extremely proud to be sponsoring yet another Dutch Playgrounds Festival event: Playgrounds Blend.

This time around we're looking at the relationship between art and innovative technologies, and we’ve gathered the most talented and innovative creative professionals in animation, game, interactive design, robotics and creative technology to discuss the 'blend' over a four days fest and conference in Breda and Amsterdam.

You can read more about the professional artists down below. Also, to our trusted readers we offer a 30% discount voucher for the entry tickets.

 

Playgrounds Blend Program

9 April   – workshops & opening night – AKV|St. Joost Breda
10 April – conference – Chassé Theatre Breda
11 April – conference – Chassé Theatre Breda
12 April – Panicroom (evening program) – PostPanic Amsterdam
13 April – conference – Pathé Tuschinski Amsterdam

30% Voucher Discount for the Wacom Community

Simply visit this landing page and use the code BLend_2018! (capitol sensitive).

 

The essence of Playgrounds

A meeting hub for some of the most remarkable artists but also a place where they can interact with students – the talents of tomorrow, and fans. A series of events that have inspiration as a currency.

More names and time schedule at www.weareplaygrounds.nl

Artist Reels

David OReilly – Everything, The External World

Golden Bear winner and an artist working in design, animation and video games. Creator of the groundbreaking animated films ‘Please Say Something’ and ‘The External World’, his film work has won numerous awards and been the subject of several retrospectives internationally.He has served as writer for the TV shows Adventure Time & South Park, and created the fictional video games in Spike Jonze’s Academy Award winning film ‘Her’. In 2014 he released his first independent game 'Mountain' and followed up with 'Everything' in 2017.

Everything won grand prizes at A MAZE & Ars Electronica and was featured as Game Of The Year by Wired, Polygon, AV Club, The New Yorker and others. Its trailer became the first ever interactive project to qualify for an Academy Award.

Curt Enderle – art director Isle of Dogs

A 1987 Minnesota State University graduate, Curt Enderle has dazzled both the theater and cinema worlds with his art direction and sets designs. In 2001 he won an Emmy Award for his art direction in the stop-motion animation sitcom on UPN called Gary and Mike. Further on he was a set designer for ParaNorman and art director for the animated feature The Boxtrolls, both of them produced by Laika.His most recent project: Isle of the Dogs is an animated feature directed by Wes Anderson following a boy's odyssey in search of his dog.

In the theater world, Curt Enderle is known for his fabulous creations for MSU's  One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest and Angels in America stagings. When talking about his work, the thing he loves most about his job is immersing himself in a time and place he wouldn’t otherwise, and finding people and places during the process he didn’t know existed.He’s now freelancing, designing theater and still doing stop-motion animation work near his home in Portland, Ore.

Marshmallow Laser Feast - VRLondon-based design studio

Marshmallow Laser Feast are always looking to create ground-breaking experiences that immerse and amaze in completely unexpected ways. Headed up by Adam Doherty, Barney Steel and Robin McNicholas, the collective employs a wealth of creative disciplines, from photo-real virtual reality to robotic performance and realtime mapping, pushing boundaries, redefining expectations and exciting audiences worldwide.

Their works range from commercial productions for the likes of U2, Volkswagen, Castrol and  McLaren, to extremely artistic and immersive experiences.

 

 

Neal Scanlan & Gustav Hoegen – Star Wars

Wookies, rodians, twi’leks and robots. The Star Wars universe is full of weird and dangerous creatures. Neal Scanlan – a London based creature and animatronic expert - brought them back to life in physical form for ‘The Force Awakens’. His outstanding work is appreciated worldwide and internationally awarded. He is a multi-Bafta Award winning artist. Scanlan - whose past work includes an Oscar for ‘Babe’ and 2012’s’ Prometheus’– received multiple awards in 2016 for his visual effects for Star Wars, like the 2016 Bafta win: best achievement in visual effects and the 2016 Empire Award win: best visual effects.Under Scanlan’s direction, the creature workshop at Pinewood Studios built more then 100 characters for The Force Awakens.

Having finished working on Rogue One, Star Wars VIII: The Last Jedi, and Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom, he now focuses on another Star Wars story. Gustav Hoegen is an animatronic expert too and known for his work for Charlie and the Chocolate Factory and The Brothers Grimm. He is also part of the Pinewood Studios team. Together, Scanlan and Hoegen worked on a lot of practical effects. After a super inspiring talk in 2016 they are back at Blend Iin a joint talk. We will learn more about their extraordinary imagination and skills.

Mr Bingo

In a splendid collaboration with Graphic Matters we present Mr Bingo to the stage. Mr Bingo was born in 1998 after a cheerful bingo night in Maidstone. It first served as a nickname among students of the Kent Institute of Art & Design, before being fully embraced as a signature and identity for its Leigh-born bearer. Mr Bingo went on to study graphic design at Bath Spa University College and specialized in illustration, graduating in 2001 and moving to London. There Mr Bingo was a commercial illustrator for 15 years, working regularly for clients such as The New Yorker, The Guardian, TIME, CH4, The Mighty Boosh & The New York Times.

An archive of the thousands of illustrations from this period doesn’t exist online because he got bored once in a motorhome and deleted his entire portfolio website. Mr Bingo and his work has been featured in a wide range of magazines including Creative Review and Icon. He was recently described by Caroline Roberts in Vroom Magazine as ‘a person who has redefined the traditional job description of an illustrator’.

Moby Francke – Riot Games

Moby Francke is a great classically trained character illustrator, best known for his works for game design studio Valve's hits: Half Life 2, Team Fortress 2, Portal, and Left 4 Dead. Born in 1972 in Washington D.C he attended from 1996 to 2001 the courses of the Academy of Art University of San Francisco.

After graduating he worked at LucasArts as a conceptual designer, and taught figure painting at the university. A turning point in his career represented his collaboration with Valve. Though he started working there almost accidentally and had to adjust to a new world of digital art and gaming, he ended up being the driving force behind Half Life's ground-breaking look and feel. The game is still considered one of the most iconic sci-fi shooter because it successfully managed to marry realistic characters with an immersive storyline while in the same time propelling the players through awe-inspiring environments. It remained a reference point in the industry for years on a row while in the same time it solidified Francke's key position within the company. He is currently working for Riot Games.

In 2009, the company released its debut title League of Legends to worldwide acclaim. His clear inspirations are the great America painters of Leyendecker and Norman Rockwell. Francke mixes these influences with his own style and applies it expertly to the field of entertainment. He combines features expertly with scalability, meaning that characters will look great from far out and close up, something especially important with character from League of Legends. He has won several awards, including two New York Society of Illustrators Competition Awards. 

]]>
Tue, 20 Mar 2018 16:25:25 +100
How To Draw A Comic Page by Miyuli http://eu.shop.wacom.eu/detail/index/sArticle/1126/sCategory/2213303 Illustrator and manga artist Miyuli, known for her comics such as Hearts for Sale and Lost Nightmare, takes us through her process of making comic pages in Clip Studio Paint Pro. This software comes bundled with our new Wacom Intuos pen tabet, which she also demonstrates in th...

How To Draw A Comic Page by Miyuli

Illustrator and manga artist Miyuli, known for her comics such as Hearts for Sale and Lost Nightmare, takes us through her process of making comic pages in Clip Studio Paint Pro. This software comes bundled with our new Wacom Intuos pen tabet, which she also demonstrates in the video below.

For anyone who loves creating and writing comics, this is a great tutorial on how to get started and learn the basics. The work you will see is from the comic ´The Idols of Solanşehir‘ written by Vera Greentea. You can watch or read the tutorial below.

Take it away Miyuli!

 

 

1) First digital sketch and traditional pencil tracing

For this project I decided to sketch the pages in Clip Studio Paint and then do the linework tradionionally on paper. I‘m using a mono eraser and a 2B pencil from faber Castell. Since it‘s just pencil I‘ll be using the cheapest and thinnest paper I could find. It‘s just regular copy paper.


Miyuli placed her printed digital sketch on a light table to add trational pencil linework

Since it‘s so damn thin I put another sheet between the printed sketch and the final linework. And then it‘s just tracing the sketch with a light table as cleanly as possible.

I used a similar technique when drawing Hearts for Sale. I like how organic pencil linework looks, though it doesn‘t necessarily fit every project. My upcoming webcomic Demon Studies (demonstudies.com) will be all digital.

2) Adding line weight

Once I’m done tracing the lines, I add some more details and line weight to the final panel. I like to do a thicker outline for characters or foreground objects. It helps separating it from the background. With details that indicate texture I try to be as light as possible so it doesn’t pop out too much.

I like to finish lining a panel before going to the next one to keep things interesting but it’s basically the same thing for all the pages.


Adding weight to the lines

3) Fixing, layering and grids in Photoshop

Once that’s all done I scan the page, tweak the levels and clean in up a little. Also, I like to separate the lines from the white background which is pretty easily done in Photoshop. You can also do it fairly easily in Clip Studio Paint but it’s just a habit for me to use Photoshop at this point.

The great advantage of doing sketches digitally is that it’s much easier to set up perspective grids. Sometimes I also like to use 3d objects like the house on the first panel. Clip Studio has a really nice perspective help.

For the digital part I’ll be using the new Wacom Intuos. I’ve done a review on the pen tablet so check that out if you want to know more about it.


After scanning the finished lined page you can tweek, fix and layer the lines in Photoshop

4) Blocking in characters and filling with basic colors

First I like to block out the characters and separate them from the background. Makes things easier later on. Once that’s done I block in the basic colours. 


Blocking filling first basic colors

5) Perspective through painting styles and adding shadows

For Solanşehir I wanted to use a colourful and saturated painting style. It’s supposed to be a little messy but being the perfectionist that I am I tend to clean it up too much.

For the actual painting I like to use a Sai Watercolour brush that I mentioned in my last video. I like the way it can produce both soft and hard edges but I also use some adjustment layers with an airbrush pen.


Showing the difference between cool and warm

This scene is starting out from a coolish grey outside setting and gradually goes into a warmer interior. The first issue has me use a lot of red, yellow and bluish tones. Giving colours a purpose makes your work a lot better but to be honest I don’t really know what I’m doing 70% of the time.

It’s basically just fooling around and guessing a lot until it looks good. But I also like to do studies and I hope I can improve my colouring and perspective work. Let me know if you would be interested in a more in-depth commentary on my work.

6) Rinse and repeat

And yeah, that’s basically it. Rinse and repeat for all the other pages.


A finished page from the comic

 

Thank you for reading

Please check out this comic’s kickstarter. It’s already funded but it would be amazing to bring the first issue to more people. I should be done with it before the campaign ends so the delivery should be pretty quickly.

Follow or support Miyuli:


Patreon - KickStarterTumblr - Twitter - Instagram - Facebook - Youtube

]]>
Fri, 16 Mar 2018 17:20:30 +100
Cardboard Creativity and Childhood Imagination http://eu.shop.wacom.eu/wacom-infochannel/cardboard-creativity-and-childhood-imagination/1125?c=2213303 Derek´s incredible props made out of cardboard are a fantastic way to demonstrate the tools of an artist. Using cardboard boxes, he created to-scale models of his 24” Cintiq, 27” iMac, apple keyboard, magic mouse, as well as a 6’4” Wacom pen that stands just a little taller th...

Cardboard Creativity and Childhood Imagination

Canada-based children’s illustrator Derek Douglas has been visiting schools to "inspire the next generation of young artists, showing them that if you love to draw, it’s actually a real job that you could have one day".

It’s not only his message that inspires - Derek´s incredible props made out of cardboard are a fantastic way to demonstrate the tools of an artist. Using cardboard boxes, he created to-scale models of his 24” Cintiq, 27” iMac, apple keyboard, magic mouse, as well as a 6’4” Wacom pen that stands just a little taller than the artist himself!

We recently contacted Derek to ask him why he made these props, what inspired him, and what his advice would be for the next generation of creatives.

Enjoy!

Who or what inspired you to start working as an artist?

As a child it was cartoons, children’s books and comic books... in that order.

I used to redraw my favourite characters as a way to learn, but as I got older it was my High School art teacher that saw some talent in me, who pushed me in the direction of art as a career.


Derek´s art studio and office with in the center a Wacom Cintiq 24HD

What is your favourite part of visiting schools to tell them about your job?

I love visiting schools to inspire the next generation of young artists, showing them that if you love to draw or paint, it’s actually a real career that's possible to obtain.

I believe that all students, whether they choose to become an artist or not, will benefit from learning how to develop their creative thinking. 


Derek teaching kids

Why did you decide to make a cardboard pen and Cintiq, and what has been the most memorable reaction to your props?

So many reasons! I originally created the props for a series of presentations for the Telling Tales Festival in Hamilton, Ontario because they're a great gag. Seeing me pretend to draw with a gigantic pen is just plain ol' ridiculous and fun. It gets laughs, screams, and sometimes really silly behaviour from the students (sometimes much to the chagrin of the teachers - but they love it too).

Using props are also a really good teaching tool. Rather than just explaining with words, it’s a visual demonstration that makes the concept of how I make my art easier to understand. Finally and probably most importantly, cardboard is one of the most accessible household materials that all kids can find in their own home.

By using cardboard, the goal is to appeal to children using a totally familiar medium and to inspire them to build their own sculptures and works of art at home. 


Derek´s cardboard collection

What would be your best piece of advice to aspiring artists?

1) Be dedicated
By choosing to be a professional artist, you’re choosing an extremely competitive field. Arm yourself by practicing (LOTS), learn it inside, outside, backwards and upside-down.

2) Be Bold
Find your own original voice. Truly strive be different and be yourself in your own work. A good chunk of the most successful artists are fearlessly original. Which leads me to...

3) Be fearless
don’t be afraid to take risks or to make mistakes. Mistakes are actually just lessons masked as failure.


Derek out and about

How does cardboard and sculpture fit into your illustration style?

In my illustration work, I like to explore and push the boundaries of new ideas. The first time I introduced cardboard into my work, I created a miniature cardboard diorama of a library, where I placed my hand-painted, cut-out, 2-D characters inside the set to take photos of them. See examples here.

Pushing the idea a bit further, I then explored by creating flat, 2-D illustrations that were cut out and separated, and then by layering them on top of each other, the final photograph of the work captures a 2-D, 3-D hybrid complete with shadows between the spaced out layers. See examples here


Paper Cut Paris (c) Derek Douglas

What are you currently working on? What’s next?

On top of meeting the demands of ongoing freelance contracts, like creating digital illustrations and animations for this amazing church using my 24” Cintiq.

In the off hours I’m writing and creating concept art for my own graphic novel. But my number one goal this year is to illustrate some more children’s books!

 

Right Side Studios

Derek has been working in the creative industry since the turn of the millennium and owns a freelance illustration company called Right Side Studios, based in Ontario, Canada.

Follow Derek on social media:

Twitter - Facebook - Instagram

 

 

 


Or follow Wacom to receive more stories like these:

Twitter - Facebook - Instagram - Youtube

]]>
Mon, 19 Feb 2018 16:47:53 +100
How To Present Your Artwork Creatively on the Wacom Gallery http://eu.shop.wacom.eu/wacom-infochannel/how-to-present-your-artwork-creatively-on-the-wacom-gallery/1124?c=2213303 In this video, we share tips on how to present your artwork and help your portfolio get the attention it deserves. We review the portfolios of a couple artists, who have mastered how to creatively share a project. Hopefully, this will provide you with the inspiration you need ...

How to Share Your Artwork Creatively on the Wacom Gallery

Written by Kenneth Shinabery

They say that presentation is everything, this also holds true to the way we present the artwork in our portfolios.

The first impression counts

When someone clicks on a project they get a first impression to the creative process. What the viewer sees will dictate whether they continues to explore the portfolio or move on. So it is essential for an artist to determine the best way to present his or her artwork.

Explore how others present Behance projects

By exploring the Wacom Gallery on Behance, you will discover both clever and creative ways to present a project. It is important to experiment and determine the best way to showcase your artwork.

In the following video below, we share tips on how to present your artwork and help your portfolio get the attention it deserves. We review the portfolios of a couple artists, who have mastered how to creatively share a project. Hopefully, this will provide you with the inspiration you need to set up an amazing portfolio on the Wacom Gallery.

 

Visit the Wacom Gallery

Learn more about Steve Simpson

Learn more about Peter Jaworoski

About Kenneth Shinabery

Kenneth is a creative from New York City living in Berlin, who has spoken at conferences across Europe regarding creativity and digital presence. Having a keen eye when it comes to discovering new talent, he has curated the Wacom Gallery on Bechance since 2014.

]]>
Mon, 19 Feb 2018 15:37:22 +100
Projection Mapping: Building a Story http://eu.shop.wacom.eu/wacom-infochannel/projection-mapping-building-a-story/1123?c=2213303 The artists of Maxin10sity use projection mapping to tell compelling stories on the front of enormous government buildings, cars, museums, palaces, universities, and at light festivals around the world. They have won awards for their innovation. So, we wanted to know more abou...

Projection Mapping: Building a Story

The artists of Maxin10sity use projection mapping to tell compelling stories on the front of enormous government buildings, cars, museums, palaces, universities, and at light festivals around the world.

They are driven by passion and creativity which has won them awards for their innovation. So, we wanted to be able to inspire our Wacom community with Maxin10sity´s story. We asked them where they get inspiration from and how they go from concept to design to a fantastic lightshow.

Enjoy the read or watch the video below.


What is Projection Mapping? 

Maxin10sity creates light shows using high-class projection mapping on government buildings, cars, museums, palaces, universities, both indoors and out. The unique shapes of the buildings make it a huge challenge to paint them, but lead artist Norbert Birgany thrives off the challenge. “Maxin10sity’s work knocked me off of my feet. I found this type of digital art a new and exciting approach, where the artworks come alive, which makes the building seem alive, as well as creating a monumental atmosphere.”

We asked about some of the projects that Maxin10sity has done in the past, and which were the most challenging or the most fun. “We have done a monumental (at that time world record breaking) mapping for the Facade of the Parliament of Romania. It was about 25.000m2 with 104pcs 20.000 ANSI projectors used at the same time,” he told us, but Birgany has his own personal favourite. “I am really keen on Ancient Greek Mythology, therefore I was so incredibly happy when I got to work on the Legacy show in Karlsruhe.”

At many of the events that Maxin10sity projects lightshows, the company is also the art director or curator of a whole event which gives full responsibility on the artistic part of it. 

How does Wacom fit into this?

“I got to know Wacom tools around 2010 when I dived into the mystery of digital art using a first generation Bamboo small,” Birgany explained. “I changed it to the large Intuos Pro the moment that I was comfortable with digital painting. With the Wacom Cintiq, doors were opened to new possibilities, and I started to establish my own little world. It offers me infinite opportunities during the creation process.”

Part of the process for creating the lightshows involves using a 3D rendering of the building they will project on, which Birgany uses to design the images and animations. During the design process, he needs to make sure that the images tell the story that Maxin10sity wants, as well as using the quirks of the building to their full potential.

It’s challenging work, and he relies on his tools to ensure that the project is a success. “Our show for the iconic TV Tower in Berlin is a great example, as in one scene we “built” a fairytale Castle Tower through digital painting. The aspect ratio and the fact that I could physically rotate the Cintiq really eased the process.”

Huge Milestones 

Two of Maxin10sity’s largest milestones were working with Audi on the Audi Late Light Show and being invited to create shows at Karlsruhe for three years running.

The Audi Late Light Show aimed to express Audi’s gratefulness towards its employees and the habitants of Ingolstadt for making the creation of the new Audi A5 Coupe happen. This 10-minute-long show lit up the 2,300-square-meters Audi Forum building by using 35 pieces of 40,000 ANSI lumen projectors. The event won many awards, and was even honored as the Most InAVative Live Event at the InAVation Awards in Amsterdam 2017.


"Working for Audi AG in 2016 is among the most enormous projects we have created."

There are huge milestones connected to Karlsruhe because of being able to create breathtaking shows. Initially, they worked on the 300th Anniversary of Karlsruhe in 2015, but this was followed by a fantastic show in 2016 in collaboration with the Badisches Landesmuseum with the title of ‘Legacy’, and most recently a show called Structures of Life in 2017. 

For the show ‘Legacy’ in 2016, Birgany got to work with one of his favourite themes, ancient Greek Mythology. “I had to create a Greek vase from the building, which was a bit difficult to be honest, because I had to consider all the little elements, details of the given building instead of treating it as a flat canvas, in order to have the painting visible.
Obviously, I had high expectations regarding this part, so all the great opportunities of the Cintiq were extremely useful. I really like that with the Cintiq I can add my unique approach, my individuality by having my own little lights, brushes, textures, etc., in brief my style.”

Timeless Tales 

Maxin10sity debuted in the US at LUMA Light Festival 2017 in Binghamton, NY, where Birgany’s work was projected onto the façade of the historic treasure Carnegie Library. The animation was based on the title Timeless Tales, and aimed to remind adults of long-forgotten fairy tales by evoking their childhood, while introducing the epic stories to the new generation. 

Birgany worked together with other creative artists to bring the show to life. “I adored painting the Gingerbread House (from Hansel and Gretel), the scene from Aladdin and also creating the Little Mermaid’s mystical underwater world in my style.” The stories of Little Red Riding Hood, Alice in Wonderland, Sleeping Beauty and the Snow Queen also appeared in the show. 


Timeless Tales - Building Projection for LUMA Festival Binghamton by Maxin10sity

"We started the entire process from sketches, then after completing the concept moods, the entire work could start. From this point András Sass, the creative director, and László Czigány, the Art Director gave me space to create it on my own.

When it comes to this point, I sit in front of Cintiq, grab the pen and the essential headset/ headphones so this way I can focus from the first stroke till the finish. The pen gives such a natural feeling, which I really need since I'm coming from the traditional world and I also still create this type of traditional art. It can make the creation process so enjoyable that you don’t even realize you’re working.”

Approaching the show from technical point of view: it’s based on digitally painted 2D pictures using Wacom Cintiq and Intuos Pro tablets that are amplified with 3D effects, and the projection was made all the more vivid by animating certain parts so each scene results in a fantastic animation.

Any tips for aspiring artists?

“I’m a perfectionist, which can be a disadvantage in most cases, I know. I can drive people aroundme crazy by this, but I believe in art there is a need for that. Demanding artwork cannot be established without perfectionism. Although, of course there should be a limit... you need to know the point when it is really finished. But I still have so many things to learn within the world of digital art and projection mapping.”

Places projected

iMapp 555 - Bucharest Parliament - 20/09/2014

Palace of Karlsruhe - Legacy - 07/08/2016

Projection Mapping on Bolshoi Theatre - 27/09/2015
2015 Art Vision Projection Mapping Competition as part of the annual Circle of Light Moscow International Festival.

HAILstorm! - Projection Mapping on Rackham Building - 27/10/2017
Maxin10sity made the final act of the Bicentennial celebrations of the prestigious University of Michigan in Ann Arbor, MI, USA

Palace of Karlsruhe - Structures of Life - 02/08/2017

FINA Budapest 2017 World Championship Opening Ceremony Projection Mapping on Buda Castle - 14/07/2017 (Hungary)

Projection Mapping on National Museum of Art Bucharest - 01/05/2017


About Maxin10sity

The company Maxin10sity was established in 2014 by multi-award winner 3D mapping artists: László Czigány and Andras Sass together with internationally experienced sales specialist: Tamás Vaspöri.

The creation of Maxin10sity is a result of passion and intensity. Passion for projection mapping and an intense desire to find new forms of creative design. Maximum intensity in artistic ideas, modern technology, award-winning expertise and international business.

Follow Maxin10sity

Portfolio - Youtube - Vimeo - Twitter - Facebook - Instagram 

 

Follow Wacom for more stories like these:

Twitter - Facebook - Instagram - Youtube

]]>
Mon, 19 Feb 2018 13:25:00 +100
GAIN EXPOSURE | Join the Wacom Gallery on Behance http://eu.shop.wacom.eu/wacom-infochannel/gain-exposure-join-the-wacom-gallery-on-behance/1122?c=2213303 If you are searching for inspiration or want to be discovered, then the Wacom Gallery is the place for you!

JOIN THE WACOM GALLERY ON BEHANCE

Written by Kenneth Shinabery

If you are searching for inspiration or want to be discovered, then the Wacom Gallery is the place for you!

What Is The Wacom Gallery?

The Wacom Gallery is a curated gallery hosted on the Behance network where you can showcase your artwork and be discovered.  Every day we feature new and brilliant artists on the front page of the gallery that can help to stimulate and fuel your creativity.

You can also search the gallery to discover other creatives in various fields, including illustration, photography, packaging design, animation, fashion design and more.

Joining The Wacom Gallery

Becoming a member of the Wacom Gallery is very easy and 100% FREE!
There are two ways to join:  

1) If you are already a member of Behance, then log into your Behance account with your Adobe ID and clicking here.

Scroll down until you see the Wacom Gallery. Then simply click the join button. This will attach your Behance Portfolio to the Wacom Gallery. It’s that simple!

2) Another way to join is to visit the Wacom Gallery.

Once there you will see a tab entitled “Sign Up & Showcase Your Work.” After clicking the tab, you will be prompted to create a FREE Adobe ID. Next, you create a profile and then you can begin to build your online portfolio.

If you already have an Adobe ID simply follow the instructions and you will be well on your way to creating an amazing portfolio.

Curation

We feature new and innovative artists daily on the front page of the gallery. This is a great way for your artwork to gain more exposure!

Each project that is added to the Wacom Gallery gets reviewed to select innovative artists to showcase.  Every project has the potential to be featured. Our criteria includes quality, originality, presentation of the artwork, and the over all look/ design.

In an upcoming article, we will share a few tips on how to create a stunning project that could lead to your work being featured on the front page of the Wacom Gallery.

In the meantime, here are a few tips:

1) Share the story behind your project.
Write a paragraph or two about how and why you were inspired to create your project.

2) Share your process.
There are several ways this can be done. It can be interesting for the curator of the Wacom Gallery and viewers of your work to learn more about the steps that you took to achieve the final creation.

3) Share close-ups.
If your work is detailed, then share close-ups of various areas so that viewers can see how much time you put into creating a certain piece of artwork.

4) Share a video or animated gif.
Creating a time lapse video or an animated gif showing how a project evolved can be highly intriguing. 

5) Finally, be authentic and genuine.
A good rule of thumb is to stay true to yourself.

 

We’re looking forward to seeing your work on the Wacom Gallery, so join today!

 

Follow Wacom across the social platforms so you don’t miss the next article!
Facebook - Twitter - Instagram - Youtube - Website

]]>
Fri, 26 Jan 2018 12:36:22 +100
Let´s Talk Art | How my Personal Work Helped Shape Me as an Artist - Ruiz Bur... http://eu.shop.wacom.eu/wacom-infochannel/lets-talk-art-how-my-personal-work-helped-shape-me-as-an-artist-ruiz-burgos/1121?c=2213303 Welcome to the next instalment of the Let’s Talk Art interview series. This time we talk with Spanish illustrator and comic artist Ruiz Burgos about his personal work, influences, formal studying, client management, and more.

How my Personal Work Helped Shape Me as an Artist

Welcome to the next instalment of the Let’s Talk Art interview series. This time we talk with Spanish illustrator and comic artist Ruiz Burgos about his personal work, influences, formal studying, client management, and more.

Ruiz resides in Granada, Spain and has a beautiful, captivating and vivid illustration style. It was great to have a closer look into his daily life as an illustrator.

"The best advice I can give anyone is to work hard and keep practicing." - Ruiz Burgos

 

 

 

 

 

 

So, Let’s talk art… 

How long have you been an illustrator?

Well, I'm an illustrator from Granada, Spain. I have been working exclusively as illustrator for the last five years. Before that I was working as a Graphic Designer for a few years, but I was never comfortable with that job.

I was always interested in design work, but once I worked as a designer for some time I realized that it's not for me. So I turned my hobby into my work, and I have been pretty lucky with that. Now I'm working for the comic book industry making covers, and recently I have discovered the alternative poster world and I'm focusing in this area.

I'm really enjoying making illustrated movie posters, but I still trying to combine this work with covers for comics, books and magazines.

You teach on IHMAN 3D School and PIXELODEON 3D School. What do you enjoy most about it?

I love teaching. It's something that has always interested me.

A couple of years ago in a comic convention in Spain, the people of IHMAN 3D School contacted me asking if I would be interested in teaching a course and it's sounded like a great opportunity to me. After that, I worked with PIXELODEON 3D SCHOOL running a new course of Digital Illustration and character design.

The experience was great, and I'll continue working with them in the future. They are doing great. I love seeing the students’ work improve during the classes. It makes me feel very proud. The meetings with the students are great, and I learn many things from them. In the end, teaching is something where both the teacher and the student learn. That's the best part.

Why did you become an illustrator and comic artist?

Art has always been part of my life, starting at childhood. My father used to make drawings with pencils and inks, and he was pretty good. My brother used to draw too. I was always watching movies and cartoons and drawing everything I saw... because they did the same.

As my father was very interested in art, so I knew a lot of artists at a very young age. At the same time, he was very passionate about cinema, and he used to collect old painted movie posters which I loved. Besides, he bought me my first comic books as a child… So, you could say I am an artist because of him.


Ghost in the Shell © Ruiz Burgos

Growing up and even now, which artists inspire you the most?

I have a huge amount of references. Not only artists. But I think my first inspiration as an artist is Drew Struzan’s work. Having grown up as a big fan of Indiana Jones and Star Wars it was impossible not to be in love with his posters (or Bob Peak, Richard Amsel, John Alvin, etc).

As art student I loved Renaissance artists such as Michelangelo or DaVinci (his fabric studies are truly inspiring) or the American illustrators of the nineteenth century like Leyendecker and especially Norman Rockwell.

Nowadays, there’re a lot of great comic artists that I love: Alex Ross, Adam Hughes, James Jean, Lee Bermejo, Paolo Rivera, Sean Murphy… the list would be endless.
The work of these artists pushes me to make things different and try new styles. Recently I'm studying movie poster artworks from modern artists like Gabz, Rory Kurtz, Martin Ansin, Ken Taylor (that's another list without end).

For the Crackdown 3 launch you created a poster with actor Terry Crews for Xbox to give to fans at San Diego Comic Con. Howdid it feel seeing Crews with your work?

Oh! That was amazing! The Crackdown poster for San Diego Comic Con was my second work with Hero Complex Gallery. When they contacted me to work on this for Xbox, I was pretty excited but I didn't know that Terry Crews was going to sign posters at the panel until the piece was finished and delivered.

When I saw the picture of Terry Crews holding my work and posing just like the portrait I painted I couldn't believe it, hehehe. Later, he wrote to me via instagram saying that he loved it and it was really cool. He was very nice.


Terry Crews showing off Ruiz´ Crakdown 3 Poster for San Diego Comic Con

How much of an influence has your Spanish environment and culture been to your work?

I’m not sure. Spain is a region with a great and rich artistic history, and I live in Granada, which is a city with a big tradition of artists (painters, musicians, composers, etc).

Most of my influences came from the pop culture and cinema. So, I don't know if my own Spanish culture has influenced my work too much.

I think that the biggest influence I get from my region is because of the people who live here. The weather, the people, the colours and the food here invites you to see the world in a positive way. And I always try to bring these colours and rich environment into my work. Besides, I have the Alhambra palace close to me. Looking at this beautiful castle and walking through its rooms and courtyards is the best inspiration possible for any artist.

What other particular things influence your work?

I think movies, mostly. I'm a big fan of all the big movie sagas (Star Wars, The Lord of the Rings, Indiana Jones, Alien, Back to the Future, The Godfather, etc). I have always loved cinema and I was lucky to be born in the 80s and to grow up during this decade and the beginning of the 90s. That totally marked me.

I have always been interested by the process behind the movie scenes, particularly in the production design. The pre-production phase and the visual part of a movie is something that’s always fascinated me. My work probably would be very different without Spielberg and George Lucas.

During your career you’ve often created personal work that has become very popular like your poster for HBO’s Westworld. How has your time spent on personal projects helped shape you?

I always try to do personal pieces between jobs. I need to because that's the only way to keep enjoying my favourite hobby. Most of my most successful works are personal works, or at least they start that way. That's really amazing.

When I work for someone and they like the final art, it’s great. But when you paint something for yourself, it’s just for fun. Then when it becomes something that a lot of people love, it's a wonderful thing. Because the personal work is 100% yours, without client feedback or anyone else's opinion.

Sometimes personal work ends up getting printed, like the Westworld poster. This case was really cool, because HBO contacted me to ask for a print of the poster. They sent it to the series creator, and that was a huge compliment to my work.

Personal work is where you normally create your personal favourite pieces, and you can spend all the time you want making things as good as possible and enjoy the making.


Westworld poster © Ruiz Burgos 

As we’re talking about your Westworld poster, how would you usually approach a project like this from start to finish?

That Westworld poster was something I painted pretty fast, in about a week or so. It started just like an Evan Rachel Wood portrait, because I really loved her character Dolores. Then I added a couple of elements more and I started playing with the idea of making a poster composition.

I usually start with a sketch of the whole composition. I spend a lot of time doing that, because I need to get the whole thing in my head before start painting.

Once I have the design clear, I do some research to find all the references that I'm going to need. I look for pictures on the internet, I take screenshots from videos and I even take my own photos.

Once I have all the resources that I will need, I start to draw the piece. And when I have the lines finished I start with colours. My process with colour is similar to a traditional painting, but digital.

Your work has a very realistic, yet comic vibe. What steps do you take to achieve this look?

My style is a mix of influences between more classic realistic illustrators and all kinds of comic book artists. I really don't think about it. It's something that came with years of practice.

Nowadays I usually try not to be too realistic. I love when I see a photo-realistic artwork and I admire the hard work behind those kinds of pieces.

I like to see the brush strokes when I look closely at a piece. That's why I always try to get a piece that seems realistic from a distance, but when you look closer you can see the process. And I probably always use bright colours because of my comic influence.

So, at the end it just a mix of preferences and influences. I paint "realistic" pieces following comic process steps (sketch, inks, flat colours, painting).

How do you typically start your work? Do you sketch on paper first or work digitally from the beginning?

I usually work directly in digital from the beginning. It does depends on the case. As the final piece is going to be digital, I normally start working that way in most cases.

I have a few screens in my studio, so I can put a lot of references near the tablet and this is more practical. Besides this, nowadays it’s really easy to find tools to make digital sketches very fast and with lots of different styles.

Sometimes I miss working on paper and I sketch something with pencils just for fun. But for me, working in digital is very similar to working in a traditional way. It's just a different tool, but the movement you need to make with your hand is basically the same.


Illustration for The Game Magazine © Ruiz Burgos

You’ve created some incredible cover illustrations for The Game Magazine. These pieces contain a lot of detail. How long do these usually take to complete?

I love working with The Game Magazine. They are really kind and I always enjoy making covers for them. They have a lot of respect for the artist's opinion and always make the process easier for me. I started working with them in 2014 making a cover for the issue dedicated to "Uncharted 4" (which is a game I loved), and after that I painted four covers more.

The art for "Star Wars Battlefront" is one of my favourites. I painted it in 2015, and I took a whole week to finish that piece, from the preliminary sketch to the final art. I normally need a few more days for something like that. But in this case we didn't have more time and I had to work a lot of hours during some days to finish all the details.

I'm a great fan of Star Wars and painting these characters and vehicles was an amazing opportunity. I think that when you really have fun working on a piece, people really can see it when they look at the final work.

Tell us a little about how you typically approach a piece like the above. Do you create a lot of concepts? How do you decide on a final composition?

Well, it depends on the work. In this particular case with the cover for The Game Magazine, I did just one sketch. And they approved it from the beginning. I think I always do only one sketch for them. They usually send me a pretty accurate description of what they want on the cover (characters, elements, background, poses), so it's easy for me to make something really close to what they want to see.

With other clients I need to send them a couple of sketches with some variants. I really don't like to have a lot of sketches and different compositions for the same piece. When you have a bunch of designs you can easily get lost... and the client even more so. That's why I prefer to have a good description of the client's vision, and then get as close as possible to that.

Out of all your pieces, is there one that was particularly time consuming or difficult and how did you overcome it?

That’s a tough question, hehe. The pieces I spend more time on are always personal works, because I have no deadline and I'm very demanding with myself.

I think the illustrations which I spend more time on are the pieces of my "The Superhero Evening Post" series because I always put a lot of small details everywhere.

I can't name one particularly. Another piece that took a long time to finish is my "Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade" poster. Indy is my all-time favourite character (along with Batman), and I painted this piece as a tribute to Drew Struzan. So, I basically tried to do my best imitating his style and this required a lot of time and extra effort. I don't think the final art is a good imitation of Drew, but I'm happy with this piece because it has a mix of his style and my own style and technique.


Batwoman © Ruiz Burgos

Every artist has their fair share of nightmare clients. Are there any memorable experiences that you can tell us about? How did you deal with them?

Yes, of course. Everyone has those kind of clients from time to time. For me, most of these cases were with projects that demanded a lot of different approval steps.

A couple of years ago I worked on a project that involved a famous actress and a well-known movie saga. My work needed to be approved for the client, the licensor and the actress herself... I needed to do a bunch of revisions and I ended repainting most of the piece twice.

And last year I had a case which involved two big movie studios. When one of them approved the piece, the other one asked for revisions and vice versa.

It's never easy when you have to make many people happy. But it's part of the work. I consider myself very lucky because I’ve only had a few cases of this kind, and it has always ended well for everyone. Most of the time the client's feedback helps you to improve the final art.

What advice would you give to artists looking to avoid any problems with potential clients?

Patience. A lot of patience. And you need to put your ego aside. Because when you have a client, the final art is not yours, it's theirs. At the end you always need to make them happy if you want to be paid. Besides, sometimes they're right! You are so close to your own work that you can't see it.

A client knows what they want, and most of the time what they want is the correct choice.

When I receive a rude feedback or I don’t agree with a client opinion, I always try to not get into an argument with them. I think that's the worst thing you can do.

So, my advice is to be patient and take the necessary time to answer controversial feedback with the right tone. Anyway, fortunately it's not something that usually happens. Most clients are great and very polite.


Indiana Jones © Ruiz Burgos

You studied illustration at the Granada School of Arts. How do you feel your time there influenced you as an artist?

Yes, I studied there, but I actually learned more from the students than from teachers.

My time as a student was very important for my career because I met someone there that pushed me (literally) into the comic book industry and professional illustration. I owe my job to this friend I met in a classroom. I learned a lot more by painting with her at home than in class during that time.

Now I think that things changed, but in my time as a student, teachers weren't interested in comic book or digital art. So, I learned a lot about traditional techniques that are very cool (like etching) but they're not practical at all in the modern professional illustration world. At least not for me.

Would you recommend that aspiring artists study formally?

Sure, totally. But my advice is to research about teachers and the content of the course beforehand. You can learn a lot from the correct people. And they could help you to find your own style, to improve your skills, or to find the perfect place for you inside the industry.

It's very important to have some help when you are still growing as an artist. And it's not easy at all to start working on this.

Especially for digital art, it's good to have someone to teach you how to use the tools and some techniques and process in order to create pieces with a professional look.

For artists who can’t study formally, what would be your advice to help them to progress in their careers?

The best way to improve your illustration skills is keep drawing or painting every day.

I still consider myself a student. I've never stopped learning. No matter how long you are working on this, you always have something to learn or something to improve. So you just keep working and learning from your own failures.

My advice to them is to try to realize what they are good at (concept, composition, characters, vehicles, landscapes, etc), and then study the work of other artists who do that. You can learn a lot by studying the work of people you admire. And work hard every day.


Ruiz Burgos´ studio

What is your current work set-up in your studio?

My work studio has changed a lot with years. I started with an old PC and a Wacom Graphire 4, and I had a Wacom Cintiq 12wx later. Now I have two iMac 27'' and a Wacom Cintiq 24 HD. And I'm very happy with this configuration.

I love to work on digital, but I need to feel it as traditional as possible. When you work on a Wacom Cintiq dispaly, it’s almost like working on paper, and I really enjoy it.
The colours are great and the resolution is really good as well. Besides, this bigger tablet has a great stand which means that you can work in different positions. I've been working on this Wacom tablet for the last three years and I'm very happy with it.

When you’re not working, what kind of things do you like to do in your spare time?

The usual, I suppose. I spend time with friends. I try to travel to visit those who live far away. I play video games. I see a lot of movies and TV series. I read (comics mainly). I'm always listening to music (I love listening to soundtracks while drawing). I play with my cat. I have two amazing nephews that I adore and I love to hang out with them whenever I can.

But my favourite hobby is still drawing. So when I'm not drawing for work, I'm probably drawing just for fun.

How do you often organize your time? Do you work a typical 9-5 day?

I totally burn the midnight oil hahaha.

I'm a total disaster when it comes to organising my time. Most of the time I'm still working at 2:00 am. I love to work at night. Everything is more quiet and I can focus better on what I'm doing without interruptions. But my sight suffers more. I should try to work more during day.

I honestly don't know how many hours a day I spend working. Sometimes it’s a lot, sometimes not so many. Probably too much, but as I mentioned before, I love my work.


Ruiz Burgos in his studio working on his Wacom Cintiq 24HD

You collect a lot of figurines, statues and memorabilia which you display in your studio. How important is your work environment for you?

My studio is the biggest room in my house by far, not kidding. I need a lot of space to work because I need to be comfortable.

I’ve been collecting figures since childhood. It's something that’s probably not going to change in the future. The only difference is that now I collect bigger, more expensive figures, comics, art books, video games, vinyls, etc.
I have six Hot Toys figures and a few others of this kind. In fact, sometimes I use these figures as reference for illustrations. I have a lot of small figures and some statues too.

I do try not to buy too much of this stuff because I'm a bit of a maniac in terms of order and organisation. I need a neat, clear and organized room to work at home.

My work is based on pop culture mostly. So I consider myself a part of it in some way. This kind of stuff is truly inspirational.

Your work has steadily gained a lot of interest online. How does it feel knowing so many people follow your art on social media?

It's amazing. I'm truly honoured by all these people who follow my work on social media and who write nice comments in my posts.

I always try to keep my feet on the ground. Followers don't define you. Some people get crazy about this kind of thing and they spend a lot of time trying to get more followers. I just keep working, learning and improving my work.

Anyway, 7,000 Instagram followers is a lot of people and I'm very grateful. It's something a bit weird to me.

I live and work in a small city in Spain, and suddenly there are people all around the world that follow my work and tell me that my pieces inspired them, or that they want to buy my art and hang it in their houses in another continent. That never ceases to amaze me.

Out of all the online platforms you have, is there a particular platform you think is best to promote your work and why?

I have a lot of platforms, but Instagram has become the best way to get followers by far in the last years. It's a platform based on images, and I think that's why a lot of artists are using it. People check it on their smartphones. So, everyone can watch your posts anytime and anywhere.

I actually think Facebook has been a better platform to promote my work professionally because of the dedicated groups. I have been using it for years, and although I have less followers there than on Instagram, I think I have obtained more jobs thanks to this social network.

Twitter is great too. I've received some awesome notes there from famous artists or celebrities, and that's really cool. As a professional, you need to be everywhere. You never know where people will find you.

What do you think you’d be doing instead if you were not an illustrator? Was there ever a time you wanted a different career?

I've never wanted to be an illustrator. I've passed a lot of time trying to find other things to do. Because painting and drawing was my hobby, and I thought that doing that for living would make me hate it.

Luckily or sadly I'm not good at anything else. I love my work, but I would have loved to work in movies. Making concepts, building sets, creating props or serving coffees.

As I love figures and statues, it's something that has always attracted me too. I tried to learn 3D. I think the illustration and drawing base helps me a lot, but learning how to use the programs and tools requires a lot of time that I haven’t got. Someday, maybe.


Imperator Furisoa © Ruiz Burgos day.

Finally, what would be one key piece of advice you would give aspiring and emerging artists who want a successful career?

I don’t know if I’m the right one to answer that question, hahaha.

I think that all you need is to make good work. If your work is good, success will find you. The best advice I can give anyone is to work hard and keep practicing.


Thank you for reading!

It’s been wonderful chatting to Ruiz and understanding his workflow, mindset and inspirations. We hope this article inspired you too.

You can follow Ruiz and his work on a variety of social networks:
Artstation - Instagram - Facebook - Twitter

If you enjoyed this article, be sure to share #LetsTalkArt with your friends! And follow Wacom across the social platforms so you don’t miss the next episode!
Facebook - Twitter - Instagram - Youtube - Website

This interview series is produced by Jack Woodhams, the founder of showcase platform PosterSpy. We would like to thank everyone who has responded positively to this series so far and hope you enjoy what´s to come

]]>
Thu, 25 Jan 2018 13:58:23 +100